Culture of Resistance

america-wakiewakie:

An Oakland Nonprofit Wants to Change the Rap Paradigm | East Bay Express
Hip Hop for Change wants to promote socially conscious artists and progressive lyricism, and organize grassroots involvement in the East Bay. The brainchild of two longtime activists, Devin Weaver and Khafre Jay (an MC himself and member of the group BPos), Hip Hop For Change views itself as a corrective measure for mainstream rap — but is critical of positive hip-hop’s trappings and clichés.
Over the past year, HH4C’s eight local showcases have drawn crowds of up to three hundred people and featured acts such as Brand Nubian, OrukusaKi, and Aisha Fukushima. The nonprofit organization is already making an impact, having written $7,000 worth of microgrants to the radical social center Quilombo, the arts nonprofit Loco, and many more causes. A concert scheduled for Saturday, August 23 at Oakland Terminal (2600 Union St.) will feature at least seven performers, including Richie Cunning, Earth Amplified, and Khafre Jay.
To fund the showcase and future performances, HH4C canvassers have sold more than 6,000 CDs in exchange for donations and a chance to explain their goals. Contributions from over 5,000 donors have helped to fund the manufacturing of CDs and T-shirts, compensate performers, and pay the organization’s six employees. Hip Hop For Change has launched an Indiegogo campaign seeking additional funds for CD reproduction equipment to manufacture future mixtapes.
"Most local hip-hop is real stories," Khafre said. "[They] come from reality, rather than corporate, homogenized, commodified hip-hop."
"What makes really awesome hip-hop is when people are being real, being honest, and being cunning," He continued.
Dealing with reality doesn’t mean that the content is necessarily pleasant, but Hip Hop For Change and its featured artists offer narratives that don’t glorify drug culture, gang violence, or misogyny. However, deconstructing those themes is important. In fact, the local rapper Do D.A.T., who’s performed in several HH4C showcases and is performing August 23, argued that the common perception of conscious hip-hop needs an overhaul itself.
"What being conscious means also needs to be reframed and reshaped," Do D.A.T. said. "To me, consciousness means you’re aware of the present moment, what you’re saying, and how it’s impacting. If you want to speak a truth that’s not pretty or uplifting, but speaks to your experience as a human being, that’s conscious."
"If you listen to a gangsta rap record, you look into issues happening in our community," he continued. "If you’re conscious enough, you can look into it and analyze it; it’s the American dream interpreted through that music. It’s coming from people who traditionally have had nothing, so of course it’s going to be exaggerated."
"Hip Hop For Change is talking to youth in low-income communities and saying, ‘We want to be part of your life, to uplift you, to continue to empower you,’" said Seneca, an Oakland rapper and activist. "What we need is more unifying events and more unifying movements in the Bay, and I think HH4C is that."
Moving forward, Hip Hop For Change seeks to expand its educational platforms and boost the radio presence of its artists. The organization’s MC program teaches the significance of hip-hop through history lessons, graffiti art, and writing raps. Many traditional schoolteachers aren’t equipped to discuss issues that often come out during the course, Khafre said, pointing to student verses on having parents in jail or teenage pregnancy.
Kensho Kuma, an Oakland Unified School District educator and bilingual MC born in Japan, thinks the course is effective. “Many of our students are apathetic about education,” he said. “Since HH4C delivers content from a hip-hop stance, the organization will be able to get through to numerous learners who would have otherwise remained uninterested.”
HH4C is also working toward securing a permanent spot on San Francisco’s KPOO 89.5 FM, a non-commercial station and one of the first on the West Coast to broadcast an all-rap show. Hip Hop For Change Radio can usually be heard on Sundays from 12 to 3 p.m., and while the show will exclusively promote conscious hip-hop, Khafre said there’s still room for all types of artists in the rap game.
"What should be pushed [on air] is every story from the hood," he said. "Not just the small, made-up portion."

america-wakiewakie:

An Oakland Nonprofit Wants to Change the Rap Paradigm | East Bay Express

Hip Hop for Change wants to promote socially conscious artists and progressive lyricism, and organize grassroots involvement in the East Bay. The brainchild of two longtime activists, Devin Weaver and Khafre Jay (an MC himself and member of the group BPos), Hip Hop For Change views itself as a corrective measure for mainstream rap — but is critical of positive hip-hop’s trappings and clichés.

Over the past year, HH4C’s eight local showcases have drawn crowds of up to three hundred people and featured acts such as Brand Nubian, OrukusaKi, and Aisha Fukushima. The nonprofit organization is already making an impact, having written $7,000 worth of microgrants to the radical social center Quilombo, the arts nonprofit Loco, and many more causes. A concert scheduled for Saturday, August 23 at Oakland Terminal (2600 Union St.) will feature at least seven performers, including Richie Cunning, Earth Amplified, and Khafre Jay.

To fund the showcase and future performances, HH4C canvassers have sold more than 6,000 CDs in exchange for donations and a chance to explain their goals. Contributions from over 5,000 donors have helped to fund the manufacturing of CDs and T-shirts, compensate performers, and pay the organization’s six employees. Hip Hop For Change has launched an Indiegogo campaign seeking additional funds for CD reproduction equipment to manufacture future mixtapes.

"Most local hip-hop is real stories," Khafre said. "[They] come from reality, rather than corporate, homogenized, commodified hip-hop."

"What makes really awesome hip-hop is when people are being real, being honest, and being cunning," He continued.

Dealing with reality doesn’t mean that the content is necessarily pleasant, but Hip Hop For Change and its featured artists offer narratives that don’t glorify drug culture, gang violence, or misogyny. However, deconstructing those themes is important. In fact, the local rapper Do D.A.T., who’s performed in several HH4C showcases and is performing August 23, argued that the common perception of conscious hip-hop needs an overhaul itself.

"What being conscious means also needs to be reframed and reshaped," Do D.A.T. said. "To me, consciousness means you’re aware of the present moment, what you’re saying, and how it’s impacting. If you want to speak a truth that’s not pretty or uplifting, but speaks to your experience as a human being, that’s conscious."

"If you listen to a gangsta rap record, you look into issues happening in our community," he continued. "If you’re conscious enough, you can look into it and analyze it; it’s the American dream interpreted through that music. It’s coming from people who traditionally have had nothing, so of course it’s going to be exaggerated."

"Hip Hop For Change is talking to youth in low-income communities and saying, ‘We want to be part of your life, to uplift you, to continue to empower you,’" said Seneca, an Oakland rapper and activist. "What we need is more unifying events and more unifying movements in the Bay, and I think HH4C is that."

Moving forward, Hip Hop For Change seeks to expand its educational platforms and boost the radio presence of its artists. The organization’s MC program teaches the significance of hip-hop through history lessons, graffiti art, and writing raps. Many traditional schoolteachers aren’t equipped to discuss issues that often come out during the course, Khafre said, pointing to student verses on having parents in jail or teenage pregnancy.

Kensho Kuma, an Oakland Unified School District educator and bilingual MC born in Japan, thinks the course is effective. “Many of our students are apathetic about education,” he said. “Since HH4C delivers content from a hip-hop stance, the organization will be able to get through to numerous learners who would have otherwise remained uninterested.”

HH4C is also working toward securing a permanent spot on San Francisco’s KPOO 89.5 FM, a non-commercial station and one of the first on the West Coast to broadcast an all-rap show. Hip Hop For Change Radio can usually be heard on Sundays from 12 to 3 p.m., and while the show will exclusively promote conscious hip-hop, Khafre said there’s still room for all types of artists in the rap game.

"What should be pushed [on air] is every story from the hood," he said. "Not just the small, made-up portion."

Reblogged from America Wakie Wakie

america-wakiewakie:

The mainstream media, even smaller progressive media, is always trying to make a buck off some shoddy, half-baked reporting. I take beef with the recent piece by ColorLines posted on Facebook with the title “Do Latinos care about Ferguson?”

This yes or no framing is a shitty false dichotomy. It’s not a yes or no question or answer, and framing it that way is really shitty for generating any sort of building between communities. Plenty of Latinos are following this story and are marching in solidarity with our black compas.

Stay focused. This is about Justice for Mike Brown, and getting Justice for Mike Brown is about dismantling an (in)justice system that doesn’t give a shit about black or brown people, whether it is ICE deporting families or Ferguson PD dropping black youth. 

Our struggles are interrelated, but right now, as full-fledged, complex human beings, Latinos can support Ferguson, push-back against our own anti-blackness, AND deal with white supremacy against Latinos too.

Intersectionality is not a zero-sum game. Much love. Keep fighting. 

Reblogged from America Wakie Wakie

red-trans:

Tear Gas Is an Abortifacient. Why Won’t the Anti-Abortion Movement Oppose It?

mangoestho:

A couple of years ago, when I was newly pregnant and reporting in the West Bank, some of my local colleagues insisted that I skip covering a protest at an Israeli checkpoint. At first, I was resistant to letting pregnancy stand in the way of my work, but they knew from experience that there might be tear gas, and tear gas, they said, causes miscarriages.

They were right: though rigorous studies are few, there is evidence that tear gas is an abortifacient. In 2011, Chile temporarily suspended its use after a University of Chile study linked it to miscarriage and fetal harm. Investigating the use of tear gas in Bahrain in 2012, Physicians for Human Rights found that local doctors were reporting increased numbers of miscarriages in exposed areas. And UN officials have connected tear gas to miscarriages in the Palestinian territories.

This means it’s likely that police in Ferguson, Missouri, have been spraying abortion-causing chemicals on crowds of civilians. Recently at TheNation.com, Dani McClain wrote about the killing of black youth as a reproductive justice issue, one that goes to the heart of the rights of parents to raise their children in peace, safety and dignity. She’s correct, of course, but if the anti-abortion movement were actually concerned about the well-being of the unborn, then the violence in Ferguson would be a pro-life issue as well.

(via erisandkallisti)

Source aloofshahbanou

Reblogged from فرح

teachingliteracy:

plannedparenthood:
BAYARD RUSTIN (1912-1987)
Bayard Rustin was an openly gay civil rights organizer and non-violent activist. He’s most well known for his work organizing the 1963 March on Washington. In 2013, Rustin was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. We honor him for his activism and commitment to nonviolence, despite being the target of violence and discrimination because of his race and his sexuality.

teachingliteracy:

plannedparenthood:

BAYARD RUSTIN (1912-1987)

Bayard Rustin was an openly gay civil rights organizer and non-violent activist. He’s most well known for his work organizing the 1963 March on Washington. In 2013, Rustin was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. We honor him for his activism and commitment to nonviolence, despite being the target of violence and discrimination because of his race and his sexuality.

Posted by
Lemond

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

PFLP leader Jarrar ordered deported to Jericho from Ramallah in dawn raid
Occupation forces raided the home of Khalida Jarrar, leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and member of the Palestinian Legislative Council, in Ramallah early on Wednesday morning, August 20, handing her an order for deportation within 24 hours to Jericho for an indefinite period.
The occupation forces attempted to force Jarrar to take sign the order, which she refused. A soldier read the text aloud, saying that the military courts, due to information from the occupation intelligence and security services, have ordered Jarrar to be deported to Jericho within 24 hours and to remain for an indefinite period within the city limits of Jericho; the soldiers left a map of the Jericho city limits.
Jarrar, a well-known prisoner advocate and chair of the prisoners’ committee of the PLC, refused to sign the order and plans to meet with her lawyer today. This is the one of the first times occupation forces have attempted to deport Palestinian political leaders internally, from one city to another inside the West Bank, since the mid-1980s.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

PFLP leader Jarrar ordered deported to Jericho from Ramallah in dawn raid

Occupation forces raided the home of Khalida Jarrar, leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and member of the Palestinian Legislative Council, in Ramallah early on Wednesday morning, August 20, handing her an order for deportation within 24 hours to Jericho for an indefinite period.

The occupation forces attempted to force Jarrar to take sign the order, which she refused. A soldier read the text aloud, saying that the military courts, due to information from the occupation intelligence and security services, have ordered Jarrar to be deported to Jericho within 24 hours and to remain for an indefinite period within the city limits of Jericho; the soldiers left a map of the Jericho city limits.

Jarrar, a well-known prisoner advocate and chair of the prisoners’ committee of the PLC, refused to sign the order and plans to meet with her lawyer today. This is the one of the first times occupation forces have attempted to deport Palestinian political leaders internally, from one city to another inside the West Bank, since the mid-1980s.

Beyond Ferguson, the pattern is clear. Blacks are always to blame, even as we are brutalized by police, ghettoized by neoliberal policies, and disenfranchised by a racist criminal (in)justice system.

But that’s the crux of white supremacist racial logic: the problem with black people is … well, black people – not mass incarceration and the deindustrialization of urban America, not educational inequality and generational poverty, not 400 years of slavery, lynchings, and Jim Crow. To be black in America is to be victimized and then made responsible for our victimization. We built this country. But, apparently, it is we who are lazy and dependent. We are bullied politically, socially and economically. But it is we who are called ‘thugs.’

Nyle Fort, "White Supremacy Is the Real Culprit in Ferguson; the Excuses Just Prove It" (via sonofbaldwin)

(via beemill)

Source sonofbaldwin

Reblogged from Son of Baldwin

erisandkallisti:

Anti-authoritarian song from Greece, based on a poem of 1978 by Katerina Gogou and remixed by DIY band “Entropia”.


One morning I’ll open the door

and I’ll get out into the streets, like I did yesterday.
And I will be thinking of nothing else
but that one piece from the father and the piece from the sea,
those only pieces that they’ve left me with.
And the city, the city that they’ve left to rot.
And our friends that have been lost.
One morning I’ll open the door
straight, dead straight into the fire
and I will get out as yesterday,
shouting at them “fascists”,
erecting barricades and throwing rocks,
with a red banner held high, shining in the sun.
I’ll open the door
and it’s not that I fear,
but, you see, I wanted to tell you that I didn’t make it on time
and that you need to learn
not to be descending to the streets without any weapons as I did,
because I didn’t make it on time,
because then you will disappear as I disappeared into vagueness,
broken into little pieces made of sea, childhood years and red banners.
One morning I’ll open the door
and I will vanish away with the dream of revolution
within the infinite loneliness of the streets on fire,
within the infinite loneliness of the paper barricades,
bearing by them a label, that you should not believe,
"Provocateur".

Reblogged from Projectile Vomit

offgriddesign:

Santiago Cirugeda is a subversive architect from Seville who has dedicated his career to reclaiming urban spaces for the public.In austerity-hit Spain where the state has retreated and around 500,000 new buildings lie empty, “people are doing things their own way,” says Cirugeda. “In times of crisis, people come together to find collective solutions.

Reblogged from Off-Grid Design