Culture of Resistance

48th Anniversary of the Founding of the Black Panther Party

PERIES: Let’s fast-forward to today. I mean, the conditions that African-Americans were facing at that time—and you look at examples of Ferguson, Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, and the list goes on. But some of the conditions that you were facing at that time is still present. You got out of prison 44 years later. The conditions seems to be more or less similar, with perhaps a few games.

What now for the young people that are organizing and working, trying to dismantle this horrid conditions, segregated conditions in large parts of Baltimore? What do you have to say to them?

CONWAY: Well, one, I’m going to disagree about the conditions being similar. No, the conditions are worse.

There is a segment of our population—I’m talking the black population right now—there’s a segment of our population that has, quote-unquote, arrived, you know, the P. Diddys, the Oprahs, the Bill Cosbys, the Jay-Zs or Beyoncés, etc., entertainers pretty much or whatever. But for the most part, most of our population is impoverished, unemployed, suffering from drug epidemics. Even those that are working and are working for large places like Walmart or Target and whatnot, they are receiving food stamps. They need food stamps to augment their salaries. So even those hard-working people that work 40 hours a week still can’t afford to live in America. So the conditions are far worse. And I think the brutality in Ferguson or Cincinnati or in New York or in Oakland—and there’s case after case after case—in Houston, in Baltimore, has gotten completely out of control.

And I think young people today probably need to go back to the basics. They need to organize in their community in ways in which they can create food security. They need to create their own particular jobs. They need to start talking about community control of the police. They need to make a determination of what they can do to gain control of the housing stock, the unused land, etc. But most of all, probably—and I don’t know how successful they will be with this, but they need to develop schools and academies, or even reading our study groups, where they can start studying history and studying what’s going on and come up with some solutions of what to do. (via 48th Anniversary of the Founding of the Black Panther Party, see also previous)

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Lemond

People get used to anything. The less you think about your oppression, the more your tolerance for it grows. After a while, people just think oppression is the normal state of things. But to become free, you have to be acutely aware of being a slave.

― Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography (via florxdexrebeldiax)

(via iamapatientboy)

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Lemond

With what the FBI can do expanding so rapidly, James Comey keeps this memo right on his desk to remind him of what the bureau shouldn’t do. Marked “secret,” it’s a 1963 request from FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Titled, “Martin Luther King Jr., Security Matter - Communist.” Hoover requests authority for “technical surveillance” of King. The approval is signed by Attorney General Robert Kennedy.Scott Pelley: And there was no court order. It was the signature of the FBI director and the signature of the attorney general?James Comey: Yep. And then open-ended. No time limit. No space restriction. No review. No oversight.Scott Pelley: And given the threats in the world today, wouldn’t that make your job so much easier?James Comey: In a sense, but also in a sense, we would give up so much that makes sure that we’re rooted in the rule of law, that I’d never want to make that trade.Some of the worst of the FBI’s history is in its investigation of Dr. King. So on Comey’s orders, FBI Academy instructors now bring new agents here (to the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, DC) to talk about values lost in the pursuit of the man who became a monument.  (via FBI director on privacy, electronic surveillance - CBS News)

With what the FBI can do expanding so rapidly, James Comey keeps this memo right on his desk to remind him of what the bureau shouldn’t do. Marked “secret,” it’s a 1963 request from FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Titled, “Martin Luther King Jr., Security Matter - Communist.” Hoover requests authority for “technical surveillance” of King. The approval is signed by Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Scott Pelley: And there was no court order. It was the signature of the FBI director and the signature of the attorney general?

James Comey: Yep. And then open-ended. No time limit. No space restriction. No review. No oversight.

Scott Pelley: And given the threats in the world today, wouldn’t that make your job so much easier?

James Comey: In a sense, but also in a sense, we would give up so much that makes sure that we’re rooted in the rule of law, that I’d never want to make that trade.

Some of the worst of the FBI’s history is in its investigation of Dr. King. So on Comey’s orders, FBI Academy instructors now bring new agents here (to the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, DC) to talk about values lost in the pursuit of the man who became a monument.

(via FBI director on privacy, electronic surveillance - CBS News)

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Lemond

On October 10, 1964, U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy signs his approval to this memo (bottom left). It sets in motion the bugging of King’s office and home telephone lines. October 7, 1963 In Reply, Please Refer to File No. 100-106670 100-3-116 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ATTORNEY GENERAL RE: MARTIN LUTHER King Jr. SECURITY MATTER - COMMUNIST COMMUNIST INFLUENCE IN RACIAL MATERS [paragraph redacted] It is further requested that authority be granted to place a technical surveillance on the SCLC office at the current New York address or to any other address to which it may be moved. Respectfully, John Edgar Hoover Director (via American RadioWorks - King’s Last March)

On October 10, 1964, U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy signs his approval to this memo (bottom left). It sets in motion the bugging of King’s office and home telephone lines. October 7, 1963 In Reply, Please Refer to File No. 100-106670 100-3-116 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ATTORNEY GENERAL RE: MARTIN LUTHER King Jr. SECURITY MATTER - COMMUNIST COMMUNIST INFLUENCE IN RACIAL MATERS [paragraph redacted] It is further requested that authority be granted to place a technical surveillance on the SCLC office at the current New York address or to any other address to which it may be moved. Respectfully, John Edgar Hoover Director (via American RadioWorks - King’s Last March)

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Lemond

Recently 60 Minutes aired a segment where FBI Director James Comey described how he threatened to quit as acting Attorney General back in 2004 rather than reauthorize warrantless wiretapping programs. He also described an old Hoover-era memo that he keeps on his desk as a reminder of what not to do. The memo is a request by J. Edgar Hoover to conduct ‘technical surveillance’ on Martin Luther King Jr. The basic impression that 60 Minutes viewers come away with is that James Comey is a man who is ‘deeply skeptical of government power.’

This 20-minute biopic was likely timed in such a way as to prepare the public for Comey’s speech this past week at the Brookings Institution. Comey explained that in order to safeguard the public against terrorism he wanted U.S. companies to modify their encryption technology to offer a special backdoor for law enforcement. Strictly speaking Comey referred to this backdoor as a ‘front door,’ but either way what he’s describing is a mechanism for the authorities to bypass encryption.

The concept of a secret golden key for authorities is a zombie idea from the 1990s. I’m talking about what’s known in cryptographic circles as ‘key escrow.’ Under key escrow vendors create a built-in decryption password (also known as a decryption key) that’s held in escrow. When law enforcement agents supply a court order they can acquire the corresponding decryption key.

Key escrow died long ago and with good reason. This is because it’s impossible to create a backdoor that only the police can access. Once the escrow key finds its way out into the wild it can be utilized by crooks, spies, and oppressive governments for their own purposes. Key escrow puts everyone at risk.

In short, Comey suggests undermining digital security and privacy across an industry while concurrently asserting that he’s ‘looking for security that enhances liberty.’

Surveillance Reform Theater | Dissident Voice

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Lemond