Culture of Resistance

F*** Voter Suppression

To all politicians who’ve ever tried to block access to voting:

What the hell is the matter with you people?! You need to get your head on straight.

The cornerstone of this great country is the right to vote – and you should be fighting to make sure that every citizen who can vote, does! But instead you’re creating obstacles for voters? Well, that makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it… F*** that!

People marched and fought and died for the right to vote. And you want to legislate away that sacrifice? Not on my watch!

Your power comes from our votes – it’s time you started fighting voter discrimination instead of passing laws that disenfranchise more and more people in this country.

We won’t let you keep getting away with it. So get off your a**es and do the right thing!

Love,

Lewis Black & 30,299 ACLU Supporters (via Jim Behrle on Twitter: “WATCH: @TheLewisBlack freaks out about voting rights. Sign his open letter: https://t.co/iQzvv5GMWWbu”)

Posted by
Lemond

euthanizeallwhitepeople:


Sexual Assault of Japanese Girls and Women Involving US Military in Okinawa
There have been  5,584 criminal cases involving US military personnel during since 1972, including 559 atrocious cases of murder, burglary and rape. In Japan, sexual and violent cases such as rape or indecent assault are often not made public, so the number of actual cases is considered much higher. There have been a handful of very notable, reported cases of US personnel attacking and murdering young Japanese girls and women:


x The 1995 Okinawa rape incident refers to a rape that took place on September 4, 1995, when three U.S. servicemen - U.S. Navy Seaman Marcus Gill and U.S. Marines Rodrico Harp and Kendrick Ledet, all from Camp Hansen on Okinawa - rented a van and kidnapped a 12-year-old Japanese girl. They beat her, duct-taped her eyes and mouth shut, and bound her hands. Gill and Harp then raped her, while Ledet claimed he only pretended to do so out of fear of Gill. The incident led to further debate over the continued presence of U.S. forces in Japan.x Two US Navy sailors have been convicted of raping a Japanese woman in Okinawa while on duty. The rape, which occurred in October, provoked anger among locals and forced the American military to enforce a curfew upon its service members.The two Americans plead guilty to the charges, admitting to raping the young Japanese woman and robbing her of about $76 in October 2012. The indictment claims that the two sailors “attacked the woman as she walked along a street in central Okinawa just before 4 a.m., choking her and covering her mouth, causing a neck sprain, as they forced her to have sex” with both of them.x The Yumiko-chan incident refers to the rape and murder of a six-year-old girl named Yumiko Nagayama (sometimes reported as Yumiko Arakaki) by a 31-year-old American soldier stationed in Okinawa, that took place September 3, 1955, ten years into the U.S. occupation of Okinawa, which at that time was not part of Japan. Yumiko went to kindergarten that day. It was noticed at about 8 p.m that she was missing, when she didn’t come home from playing outdoors when the sun set.The next day, her body was found in a military garbage dump on the Kadena Air Base. She had been raped and murdered, and her body looked as if it had “been cut up with a sharp knife from the abdominal region to the bowel.” An indictment was submitted against Sergeant Isaac J. Hurt (sometimes incorrectly reported as Isaac J. Hart) of B Battalion, 32nd Artillery Division, on charges of murder, rape and kidnapping of a girl.

Much of the native Okinawan population overwhelming supports closing of US bases on the islands. The Japanese government has begun talks to consider closing the controversial US Marines base Futenma within the next few years. However, it will only be located;The relocation project outlines that 60 hectares of coastal land would need to be reclaimed during the five-year construction plan, much to the annoyance and anger of local prefectural officials, as well as the islanders, who are concerned that the construction work will irrevocably damage the local fishing industry as well as the natural environment. x
US Military presence in Okinawa is not only a drain on our people, but even today poses a very dangerous and very real risk to the Japanese people who rightfully belong and exist there.
Some more white history / white culture for your morning.

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

Sexual Assault of Japanese Girls and Women Involving US Military in Okinawa

There have been  5,584 criminal cases involving US military personnel during since 1972, including 559 atrocious cases of murder, burglary and rape. In Japan, sexual and violent cases such as rape or indecent assault are often not made public, so the number of actual cases is considered much higher. There have been a handful of very notable, reported cases of US personnel attacking and murdering young Japanese girls and women:

x The 1995 Okinawa rape incident refers to a rape that took place on September 4, 1995, when three U.S. servicemen - U.S. Navy Seaman Marcus Gill and U.S. Marines Rodrico Harp and Kendrick Ledet, all from Camp Hansen on Okinawa - rented a van and kidnapped a 12-year-old Japanese girl. They beat her, duct-taped her eyes and mouth shut, and bound her hands. Gill and Harp then raped her, while Ledet claimed he only pretended to do so out of fear of Gill. The incident led to further debate over the continued presence of U.S. forces in Japan.

x Two US Navy sailors have been convicted of raping a Japanese woman in Okinawa while on duty. The rape, which occurred in October, provoked anger among locals and forced the American military to enforce a curfew upon its service members.

The two Americans plead guilty to the charges, admitting to raping the young Japanese woman and robbing her of about $76 in October 2012. The indictment claims that the two sailors “attacked the woman as she walked along a street in central Okinawa just before 4 a.m., choking her and covering her mouth, causing a neck sprain, as they forced her to have sex” with both of them.

x The Yumiko-chan incident refers to the rape and murder of a six-year-old girl named Yumiko Nagayama (sometimes reported as Yumiko Arakaki) by a 31-year-old American soldier stationed in Okinawa, that took place September 3, 1955, ten years into the U.S. occupation of Okinawa, which at that time was not part of Japan. Yumiko went to kindergarten that day. It was noticed at about 8 p.m that she was missing, when she didn’t come home from playing outdoors when the sun set.

The next day, her body was found in a military garbage dump on the Kadena Air Base. She had been raped and murdered, and her body looked as if it had “been cut up with a sharp knife from the abdominal region to the bowel.” An indictment was submitted against Sergeant Isaac J. Hurt (sometimes incorrectly reported as Isaac J. Hart) of B Battalion, 32nd Artillery Division, on charges of murder, rape and kidnapping of a girl.

Much of the native Okinawan population overwhelming supports closing of US bases on the islands. The Japanese government has begun talks to consider closing the controversial US Marines base Futenma within the next few years. However, it will only be located;
The relocation project outlines that 60 hectares of coastal land would need to be reclaimed during the five-year construction plan, much to the annoyance and anger of local prefectural officials, as well as the islanders, who are concerned that the construction work will irrevocably damage the local fishing industry as well as the natural environment. x

US Military presence in Okinawa is not only a drain on our people, but even today poses a very dangerous and very real risk to the Japanese people who rightfully belong and exist there.

Some more white history / white culture for your morning.

(via hyggehaven)

rrosequartz:

destructive-creature:

"At Rio Americano High School in Sacramento CA, a student named Dejza, was violently assaulted by a vice principal, Matt Collier, for attempting to take back a piece of art with a political message that the administration didn’t like. She was put in a chokehold and slammed against the desk. When she tried to resist this unlawful abuse of authority, she was slammed and held onto the ground. Matt Collier laid on top of her, crushing her with his weight. Dejza could not breathe, and begged Collier to get off of her. Luckily, another faculty member came in and ended the situation. Dejza went to see a doctor for severe whiplash, and yesterday was her first day of physical therapy. Despite this being blatantly wrong and illegal, the administration has put her on suspension for resisting, and Collier was not disciplined. On the fifth day of her suspension, she will attend a meeting held by bias members of the administration to determine if she will be expelled.

They have tried to silence anyone who speaks out on social media, but today we have gathered in person for a silent sit-in protest.

Dejza has been wronged, and brutalized, and now she is receiving punishment. They’ve tried to silence her. They’ve tried to silence us.” -Grant Wright 

One of my friends Grant posted this on facebook and even though im not in Sacramento I want to help. This girl has been mistreated by a full grown man who may never be punished. I want to help spread awareness. So please, spread this around. Let people know that this is NOT okay. The more support we have, the better. 

i’m so proud to have been a part of this today but you guys please please please please reblog/spread this around any way you possibly can it’s so important and her story needs to be heard by people outside of our city because what this man did is so so so incredibly far from okay

(via xicanapower)

humanrightswatch:

Caught on Film - Excessive Use of Force by Hong Kong Police
It’s dark in the some of the grainy video clips, but clear enough to expose an alarming development in the ongoing protests in Hong Kong: police in four different incidents at Lung Wo Road beating, kicking, or pepper spraying protesters who appear to offer no resistance or present no clear threat.
In the early hours of October 15, hundreds of police officers told 50-100 protestors to leave Lung Wo Road in Admiralty, where they had been since the previous evening. Police then started to remove barricades set up by the protesters; protesters responded by holding up hands and opened umbrellas in anticipation of being pepper sprayed. The scene turned chaotic moments later as police pushed forward to force the protesters who refused to leave the road and used pepper spray and police batons against them.
In one video clip, six police officers arrest a protester, carry him away to a darkened corner, and beat and kick him for four minutes while he lies on the ground offering no resistance. In another clip, police pepper spray a protester in the face at close range even though he has his hands up and offers no resistance; the same clip shows police yelling at journalists to leave while they were filming.
A police spokesperson said the protesters had to be dispersed because they were disrupting public order and gathering illegally, and that some had kicked and attacked officers with umbrellas. According to the spokesperson, 45 protesters had been arrested, and four officers were injured on Lung Wo Road. Eyewitnesses who spoke to us reported no such violence. Even if the police version is accurate, the excessive force used against peaceful protesters who are not resisting is utterly unacceptable.  
Since these demonstrations began, the Hong Kong police have for the most part acted with restraint other than their use of pepper spray and teargas on September 28 and 29 and their failure to protect peaceful demonstrators in Mongkok on October 3. It is not clear whether last night’s developments represented a change in tactics or isolated incidents of poor policing. But the fact that between half and one-third of the protesters arrested last night told their lawyers they were slapped or kicked by police is alarming, and raises more questions about police conduct.
Within hours after the video was first aired by a local television station, Hong Kong police responded by expressing concern, “reassigning” the offending officers to other positions, and vowing to undertake an “impartial investigation” into the case. While the speedy response to last night’s incidents is a positive step, it comes closely on the heels of the September 28-29 and October 3 instances of questionable police conduct. An investigation into all three incidents is imperative to halt eroding confidence in Hong Kong’s police force. 
Photo: A police officer yells at protesters to move away from the road as they try to block an area near the government headquarters building in Hong Kong October 15, 2014. Reuters

humanrightswatch:

Caught on Film - Excessive Use of Force by Hong Kong Police

It’s dark in the some of the grainy video clips, but clear enough to expose an alarming development in the ongoing protests in Hong Kong: police in four different incidents at Lung Wo Road beating, kicking, or pepper spraying protesters who appear to offer no resistance or present no clear threat.

In the early hours of October 15, hundreds of police officers told 50-100 protestors to leave Lung Wo Road in Admiralty, where they had been since the previous evening. Police then started to remove barricades set up by the protesters; protesters responded by holding up hands and opened umbrellas in anticipation of being pepper sprayed. The scene turned chaotic moments later as police pushed forward to force the protesters who refused to leave the road and used pepper spray and police batons against them.

In one video clip, six police officers arrest a protester, carry him away to a darkened corner, and beat and kick him for four minutes while he lies on the ground offering no resistance. In another clip, police pepper spray a protester in the face at close range even though he has his hands up and offers no resistance; the same clip shows police yelling at journalists to leave while they were filming.

A police spokesperson said the protesters had to be dispersed because they were disrupting public order and gathering illegally, and that some had kicked and attacked officers with umbrellas. According to the spokesperson, 45 protesters had been arrested, and four officers were injured on Lung Wo Road. Eyewitnesses who spoke to us reported no such violence. Even if the police version is accurate, the excessive force used against peaceful protesters who are not resisting is utterly unacceptable.  

Since these demonstrations began, the Hong Kong police have for the most part acted with restraint other than their use of pepper spray and teargas on September 28 and 29 and their failure to protect peaceful demonstrators in Mongkok on October 3. It is not clear whether last night’s developments represented a change in tactics or isolated incidents of poor policing. But the fact that between half and one-third of the protesters arrested last night told their lawyers they were slapped or kicked by police is alarming, and raises more questions about police conduct.

Within hours after the video was first aired by a local television station, Hong Kong police responded by expressing concern, “reassigning” the offending officers to other positions, and vowing to undertake an “impartial investigation” into the case. While the speedy response to last night’s incidents is a positive step, it comes closely on the heels of the September 28-29 and October 3 instances of questionable police conduct. An investigation into all three incidents is imperative to halt eroding confidence in Hong Kong’s police force. 

Photo: A police officer yells at protesters to move away from the road as they try to block an area near the government headquarters building in Hong Kong October 15, 2014. Reuters

(via anarcho-queer)

Source humanrightswatch

Reblogged from