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EU Parliament rejects ACTA anti-piracy treaty
Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. The European
Parliament has overwhelmingly defeated the international ACTA anti-piracy agreement, after fears that it would limit Internet freedom. A “no” vote in the Parliament on Wednesday would kill the treaty as far as the European Union is concerned. Supporters say that ACTA — the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — is needed to harmonize international standards to protect the rights of those who produce music, movies, pharmaceuticals, fashion goods and other products that often fall victim to piracy and intellectual property theft. Opponents say it would stifle free access to information. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz) 

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EU Parliament rejects ACTA anti-piracy treaty

Green Party members of the European parliament demonstrate against the ACTA project (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement) during the vote Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. The European

Parliament has overwhelmingly defeated the international ACTA anti-piracy agreement, after fears that it would limit Internet freedom. A “no” vote in the Parliament on Wednesday would kill the treaty as far as the European Union is concerned. Supporters say that ACTA — the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — is needed to harmonize international standards to protect the rights of those who produce music, movies, pharmaceuticals, fashion goods and other products that often fall victim to piracy and intellectual property theft. Opponents say it would stifle free access to information. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz)

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Source Boston.com

the-trigger:


The question remaining is: What will the European countries decide on their own national levels? If the arms licenses to Qatar and Saudi Arabia are not suspended, the sector’s regulations will prove to be no more than empty shells. If they are suspended, FN Herstal loses one of its bigger customers, and the whole Belgian weapons industry is endangered.

Profit and Proliferation, Part 2: Will Belgian Arms End Up in Syria?
—
The picture shows the oldest Belgian bullet I’ve found, in Misurata, dating from 1966.

the-trigger:

The question remaining is: What will the European countries decide on their own national levels? If the arms licenses to Qatar and Saudi Arabia are not suspended, the sector’s regulations will prove to be no more than empty shells. If they are suspended, FN Herstal loses one of its bigger customers, and the whole Belgian weapons industry is endangered.

Profit and Proliferation, Part 2: Will Belgian Arms End Up in Syria?

The picture shows the oldest Belgian bullet I’ve found, in Misurata, dating from 1966.

dobbaaa:

deafmuslimpunx:

Neo-imperialism under the guise of, more commonly known as capitalism, free market, and neoliberalism.

We talk about neo-imperialism a lot in my anthro class, and people are like “wat no it’s all good.”

Sweden should be on this map, too! Murky business going on, with two swedish journalists, Martin Schibbye and Johan Persson, who were investigating Lundin Petroleums possible crimes against international laws, now sentenced to eleven years in Ethiopian prison,  acused of terrorcrime. Carl Bildt should figure with his own flag here..

dobbaaa:

deafmuslimpunx:

Neo-imperialism under the guise of, more commonly known as capitalism, free market, and neoliberalism.

We talk about neo-imperialism a lot in my anthro class, and people are like “wat no it’s all good.”

Sweden should be on this map, too!
Murky business going on, with two swedish journalists, Martin Schibbye and Johan Persson, who were investigating Lundin Petroleums possible crimes against international laws, now sentenced to eleven years in Ethiopian prison,  acused of terrorcrime. Carl Bildt should figure with his own flag here..

(via anti-propaganda)


*** EU ALERT ***

After a heated debate in Brussels today, the responsible committee in the European Parliament has decided to not send ACTA to the European Court of Justice, but to press on and make a final decision right away. This means that the final battle of ACTA stands right now, and has finished before the height of midsummer.
After the recent huge Europe-wide protests, which caught the politicians by surprise, the European Commission tried to take back the initiative by saying it would send ACTA to the European Court of Justice. In doing so, the Commission would ask for the court’s opinion on whether the repressive legislation package was compatible with human rights and charters of the European Union. Since this would stall ACTA for a year if not more, the activist corps calmed down: with this move from the Commission, the final showdown would now be at least two years out.
This also appears to have been the intent of the European Commission: to drain the protests of energy, sending the message that the final decision has been postponed by some two years. The European Parliament would have its own opportunity to ask questions of the Court regarding ACTA, making sure that the Court got the right and relevant questions.
But all of a sudden, with the committee’s decision to press for a parliamentary decision rather than following the Commission, ACTA is back on the short track for the deciding vote in the European Parliament – regardless whether or not the Commission sends it to European Court of Justice for evaluation. It should also be noted that the European Commission has not made any formal decision to actually get the court’s decision – saying so may or may not have been a smokescreen.
[…]
Regardless, with the Parliament pressing forward, it is quite possible that the European Commission admits that its cards have been called and that it doesn’t send ACTA to the European Court of Justice at all; that playing this card was all just a tactical move to drain the activists of energy. If the Commission still sends ACTA to the Court, it will create an odd situation if Parliament says yes and the Court later says no – creating a situation where Parliament would have approved an illegal bill. Therefore, it is now completely safe to vote no to ACTA.
This is the fight we have to win. This is where we must ramp up the pressure on the European Parliament, which is where the battle for next-generation liberties will be going down in the next ten weeks in a series of small but important skirmishes leading up to the end-of-game boss: the vote on the floor of Parliament.
This is it. This is the showdown. This is the fight we have to win. The European Parliament’s vote is going to be the pivotal moment, not just for ACTA, but for the general trends in decades to come.
The ACTA showdown is now in progress, and if us activists don’t show up for the showdown, the show’s going down. We had a beautiful show-up in February, sending tremors to Brussels. Now, we need to repeat that message loud enough to be heard – in all the ways we can think of – for the next two and a half months.
Source (in Swedish): Hax, blogger from inside the European Parliament. ACTA: Showdown Imminent, Battle Stations, Battle Stations!

*** EU ALERT ***

After a heated debate in Brussels today, the responsible committee in the European Parliament has decided to not send ACTA to the European Court of Justice, but to press on and make a final decision right away. This means that the final battle of ACTA stands right now, and has finished before the height of midsummer.

After the recent huge Europe-wide protests, which caught the politicians by surprise, the European Commission tried to take back the initiative by saying it would send ACTA to the European Court of Justice. In doing so, the Commission would ask for the court’s opinion on whether the repressive legislation package was compatible with human rights and charters of the European Union. Since this would stall ACTA for a year if not more, the activist corps calmed down: with this move from the Commission, the final showdown would now be at least two years out.

This also appears to have been the intent of the European Commission: to drain the protests of energy, sending the message that the final decision has been postponed by some two years. The European Parliament would have its own opportunity to ask questions of the Court regarding ACTA, making sure that the Court got the right and relevant questions.

But all of a sudden, with the committee’s decision to press for a parliamentary decision rather than following the Commission, ACTA is back on the short track for the deciding vote in the European Parliament – regardless whether or not the Commission sends it to European Court of Justice for evaluation. It should also be noted that the European Commission has not made any formal decision to actually get the court’s decision – saying so may or may not have been a smokescreen.

[…]

Regardless, with the Parliament pressing forward, it is quite possible that the European Commission admits that its cards have been called and that it doesn’t send ACTA to the European Court of Justice at all; that playing this card was all just a tactical move to drain the activists of energy. If the Commission still sends ACTA to the Court, it will create an odd situation if Parliament says yes and the Court later says no – creating a situation where Parliament would have approved an illegal bill. Therefore, it is now completely safe to vote no to ACTA.

This is the fight we have to win. This is where we must ramp up the pressure on the European Parliament, which is where the battle for next-generation liberties will be going down in the next ten weeks in a series of small but important skirmishes leading up to the end-of-game boss: the vote on the floor of Parliament.

This is it. This is the showdown. This is the fight we have to win. The European Parliament’s vote is going to be the pivotal moment, not just for ACTA, but for the general trends in decades to come.

The ACTA showdown is now in progress, and if us activists don’t show up for the showdown, the show’s going down. We had a beautiful show-up in February, sending tremors to Brussels. Now, we need to repeat that message loud enough to be heard – in all the ways we can think of – for the next two and a half months.

Source (in Swedish): Hax, blogger from inside the European Parliament.

ACTA: Showdown Imminent, Battle Stations, Battle Stations!

Posted by
Anonymiss Express

reuters:

Policeman strikes AFP photojournalist Patricia Melo during the Portuguese general strike in Lisbon March 22, 2012.

Portugal faces a general strike by workers angered by austerity measures imposed as a condition of a 78-billion euro bailout last year but doubts remain as to whether Thursday’s stoppage will receive widespread support. [REUTERS/Hugo Correia]

Read more: Portuguese strike against austerity snarls transport

(via queerencia-deactivated20130103)