Culture of Resistance

iwishforanother:

ramsey clark, we have not see his life again.  certainly not eric holder.

We have witnessed confrontations between police and citizens fraught with violent potential in many parts of the nation.  Some have been preceded by skillful psychological buildups designed to create apprehension.  Wild rumors, promising immense crowds, traffic paralysis, rioting and looting have flourished for weeks and even months before a number of such demonstrations.  Crowds of tens of thousands have assembled and protested.  Among them have been individuals intent on creating trouble; violence if possible.    Experience to date shows such crowds can be controlled without significant violence.  They can be controlled without denying rights of speech and assembly.  It is well to remember President Kennedy’s observation that those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent revolution inevitable.  Above all, such crowds can be controlled without excessive force and violence by police.    Of all violence, police violence in excess of authority is the most dangerous.  For who will protect the public when the police violate the law?    The need is constant communication.  Careful sifting of rumors can eliminate the 99% that are obviously unfounded without escalating public apprehension by giving them credibility.  The clear offer of a fair and reasonable accommodation of requests to assemble and speak reduces the risk of violence.  Careful distinction between non-violent demonstrators acting within the law and those who commit violence, protecting one, arresting the other, is essential to avoid the non-violent in violence.  An express mandate to the entire police complement to use the minimum force necessary to execute lawful orders, to refrain from use of excessive force must be understood by every officer.  A constant turnover of men at critical or sensitive duty stations will relieve tensions and cool tempers.  Constant presence by high Departmental officials will better assure a professional discipline.  Firm appropriate action is needed when police themselves violate the law.    Crowd control under such circumstances is far from an easy task.  It has been accomplished under great provocation without excessive force by the police.    It is the duty of leadership and law enforcement to control violence, not cause it.  To seek ways of relieving tension, not to look for a fight.  A professional police department, properly instructed, well trained, well paid, adequately staffed can do this.  Balance, firm effective enforcement of the law, neither overaction, nor underaction, these are the needs.  Professionals can succeed.  Our liberty and security depend on them.    —Remarks by Ramsey Clark to the National Commission on Causes and Prevention of Violence, Washington, DC, September 18, 1968

iwishforanother:

ramsey clark, we have not see his life again.  certainly not eric holder.

We have witnessed confrontations between police and citizens fraught with violent potential in many parts of the nation.  Some have been preceded by skillful psychological buildups designed to create apprehension.  Wild rumors, promising immense crowds, traffic paralysis, rioting and looting have flourished for weeks and even months before a number of such demonstrations.  Crowds of tens of thousands have assembled and protested.  Among them have been individuals intent on creating trouble; violence if possible.
   
Experience to date shows such crowds can be controlled without significant violence.  They can be controlled without denying rights of speech and assembly.  It is well to remember President Kennedy’s observation that those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent revolution inevitable.  Above all, such crowds can be controlled without excessive force and violence by police.
   
Of all violence, police violence in excess of authority is the most dangerous.  For who will protect the public when the police violate the law?
   
The need is constant communication.  Careful sifting of rumors can eliminate the 99% that are obviously unfounded without escalating public apprehension by giving them credibility.  The clear offer of a fair and reasonable accommodation of requests to assemble and speak reduces the risk of violence.  Careful distinction between non-violent demonstrators acting within the law and those who commit violence, protecting one, arresting the other, is essential to avoid the non-violent in violence.  An express mandate to the entire police complement to use the minimum force necessary to execute lawful orders, to refrain from use of excessive force must be understood by every officer.  A constant turnover of men at critical or sensitive duty stations will relieve tensions and cool tempers.  Constant presence by high Departmental officials will better assure a professional discipline.  Firm appropriate action is needed when police themselves violate the law.
   
Crowd control under such circumstances is far from an easy task.  It has been accomplished under great provocation without excessive force by the police.
   
It is the duty of leadership and law enforcement to control violence, not cause it.  To seek ways of relieving tension, not to look for a fight.  A professional police department, properly instructed, well trained, well paid, adequately staffed can do this.  Balance, firm effective enforcement of the law, neither overaction, nor underaction, these are the needs.  Professionals can succeed.  Our liberty and security depend on them.
   
Remarks by Ramsey Clark to the National Commission on Causes and Prevention of Violence, Washington, DC, September 18, 1968

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Lemond