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39 posts tagged police

satanic-capitalist:

Video Of Police Abuse Is Gut-Wrenching [VIDEO]

Published on Feb 26, 2014

"A video of a police stop in the Bronx has gone viral on Facebook, eliciting hundreds of anti-NYPD comments and leading to a change.org petition to have the officers in the video investigated.

The video shows two officers restraining and arresting a man who exited a Bx12 bus Sunday afternoon on Pelham Parkway near White Plains Rd.

The footage was later posted on Facebook by Monroe College student Dariel Reyes.

In the video, a man can be seen being confronted by the pair of officers. The man attempts to stand up when the two officers grab him by both arms.”* The Young Turks hosts Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian break it down.

*Read more here from Denis Slattery & Mark Morales / New York Daily News:
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/b…

**********

The Largest Online News Show in the World. Hosted by Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian. LIVE STREAMING weekdays 6-8pm ET.

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We are a rare show that combines all of the news that people care about in one place. We are not afraid to talk about politics and entertainment and sports and pop culture. But that is not the revolution either.

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Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

iwishforanother:

ramsey clark, we have not see his life again.  certainly not eric holder.

We have witnessed confrontations between police and citizens fraught with violent potential in many parts of the nation.  Some have been preceded by skillful psychological buildups designed to create apprehension.  Wild rumors, promising immense crowds, traffic paralysis, rioting and looting have flourished for weeks and even months before a number of such demonstrations.  Crowds of tens of thousands have assembled and protested.  Among them have been individuals intent on creating trouble; violence if possible.    Experience to date shows such crowds can be controlled without significant violence.  They can be controlled without denying rights of speech and assembly.  It is well to remember President Kennedy’s observation that those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent revolution inevitable.  Above all, such crowds can be controlled without excessive force and violence by police.    Of all violence, police violence in excess of authority is the most dangerous.  For who will protect the public when the police violate the law?    The need is constant communication.  Careful sifting of rumors can eliminate the 99% that are obviously unfounded without escalating public apprehension by giving them credibility.  The clear offer of a fair and reasonable accommodation of requests to assemble and speak reduces the risk of violence.  Careful distinction between non-violent demonstrators acting within the law and those who commit violence, protecting one, arresting the other, is essential to avoid the non-violent in violence.  An express mandate to the entire police complement to use the minimum force necessary to execute lawful orders, to refrain from use of excessive force must be understood by every officer.  A constant turnover of men at critical or sensitive duty stations will relieve tensions and cool tempers.  Constant presence by high Departmental officials will better assure a professional discipline.  Firm appropriate action is needed when police themselves violate the law.    Crowd control under such circumstances is far from an easy task.  It has been accomplished under great provocation without excessive force by the police.    It is the duty of leadership and law enforcement to control violence, not cause it.  To seek ways of relieving tension, not to look for a fight.  A professional police department, properly instructed, well trained, well paid, adequately staffed can do this.  Balance, firm effective enforcement of the law, neither overaction, nor underaction, these are the needs.  Professionals can succeed.  Our liberty and security depend on them.    —Remarks by Ramsey Clark to the National Commission on Causes and Prevention of Violence, Washington, DC, September 18, 1968

iwishforanother:

ramsey clark, we have not see his life again.  certainly not eric holder.

We have witnessed confrontations between police and citizens fraught with violent potential in many parts of the nation.  Some have been preceded by skillful psychological buildups designed to create apprehension.  Wild rumors, promising immense crowds, traffic paralysis, rioting and looting have flourished for weeks and even months before a number of such demonstrations.  Crowds of tens of thousands have assembled and protested.  Among them have been individuals intent on creating trouble; violence if possible.
   
Experience to date shows such crowds can be controlled without significant violence.  They can be controlled without denying rights of speech and assembly.  It is well to remember President Kennedy’s observation that those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent revolution inevitable.  Above all, such crowds can be controlled without excessive force and violence by police.
   
Of all violence, police violence in excess of authority is the most dangerous.  For who will protect the public when the police violate the law?
   
The need is constant communication.  Careful sifting of rumors can eliminate the 99% that are obviously unfounded without escalating public apprehension by giving them credibility.  The clear offer of a fair and reasonable accommodation of requests to assemble and speak reduces the risk of violence.  Careful distinction between non-violent demonstrators acting within the law and those who commit violence, protecting one, arresting the other, is essential to avoid the non-violent in violence.  An express mandate to the entire police complement to use the minimum force necessary to execute lawful orders, to refrain from use of excessive force must be understood by every officer.  A constant turnover of men at critical or sensitive duty stations will relieve tensions and cool tempers.  Constant presence by high Departmental officials will better assure a professional discipline.  Firm appropriate action is needed when police themselves violate the law.
   
Crowd control under such circumstances is far from an easy task.  It has been accomplished under great provocation without excessive force by the police.
   
It is the duty of leadership and law enforcement to control violence, not cause it.  To seek ways of relieving tension, not to look for a fight.  A professional police department, properly instructed, well trained, well paid, adequately staffed can do this.  Balance, firm effective enforcement of the law, neither overaction, nor underaction, these are the needs.  Professionals can succeed.  Our liberty and security depend on them.
   
Remarks by Ramsey Clark to the National Commission on Causes and Prevention of Violence, Washington, DC, September 18, 1968

Posted by
Lemond

sustainableprosperity:

Police Shot Teen in Toronto (UPDATE: Officer Charged) (by The Young Turks)

Published on Aug 20, 2013

"A shooting death that has captured the nation’s attention and sparked debate about police use of force took a dramatic turn Monday, when the Toronto officer involved in Sammy Yatim’s killing was charged with second-degree murder and the victim’s family issued its most critical statement yet." Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian of The Young Turks discuss the story and contrast the response to the shooting to the way we typically handle things in the United States. 

Tell us what you think of the charges in the comment section below.

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Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

satanic-capitalist:

Published on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 by Common Dreams

Image of Gas Attack Against Lone Brazilian Woman Goes Viral

Shocking images of police violence draw much-needed attention to protests and larger issue of police brutality
- Lauren McCauley, staff writer

A more widely-cropped version of the now viral photograph shows just how isolated the woman was when she was attacked by officers in Rio de Janiero, Brazil Monday evening. (Photo: Victor Caivano)A captured instance of brazen police brutality against a civilian has, once again, captured the attention of the global community. The shocking photograph of a lone woman being pepper sprayed at close range by Brazilian police has gone viral, drawing criticism and attention to the ongoing mass demonstrations in Brazil—at which the attack took place—and the chronic undercurrent of police violence that so often follows peaceful citizen uprisings.
New York Magazine’s Daily Intelligencer spoke with the photographer behind the image, Victor Caivano, who said that the attack happened at around 11:20 PM Monday evening, long after “the protest was over, riots included.”
The woman appeared to be a “normal, middle-class university student,” he said, adding that she was standing alone on a “deserted corner” after the police had cleared the area.
He continued:

Three riot officers approached the woman and told her to leave. When she objected — the woman either questioned the order or insisted that she wasn’t doing anything wrong, Caivano recalls — she was pepper-sprayed. “This policeman just didn’t think twice,” Caivano says.
The woman stumbled backward, “screaming and cursing.” She was detained and taken to a police van. Caivano says local reporters are now trying to track her down.

The photograph has drawn obvious comparison to two similar images of the unbridled use of pepper spray, each encapsulating the fierce police brutality that too often comes hand-in-hand with such demonstrations.
One is of a woman named Ceyda Sungur—the ‘woman in the red dress’—who, during arecent protest in Istanbul’s Gezi Park, was bombarded by an officer who shot pepper spray directly into her face.
“The jet sent her hair billowing upwards,” wrote the Guardian at the time. “As she turned, the masked policeman leapt forward and hosed down her back. The unprovoked attack left her and other activists choking and gasping for breath; afterwards Sungur collapsed on a bench.”
Ceyda Sungur is gassed in Gezi Park in Istanbul, Turkey on June 4, 2013. (Screenshot via Osman Orsal /YouTube)The second image is of the infamous incident at the University of California at Davis when a peaceful Occupy protest was met with an overly aggressive show of police force. This culminated in Officer John Pike directly and deliberately spraying burning yellow chemicals into the faces of the protesters.
“To see unarmed, unaggressive bystanders who, by virtue of their location at a time and place where trouble was brewing, were assaulted by authority figures spraying burning, toxic, chemicals, is an unforgettable visual,” writes columnist Lorraine Devon Wilke. She continues:

Likely there are many more that occur every day; these particular ones exist as iconic moments that symbolize bigger movements, of countries, of people, even of students. These images are important historical documents of what happened, how, and to whom. Hopefully they will contribute, by sheer virtue of their shock value, to change, progress, and needed solutions; the agony of those attacked has to account for something of value.

Twenty-one students and alumni filed a federal lawsuit on February 22, 2012 against UC Davis over the University’s treatment of protesters during a Nov. 18, 2011 Occupy demonstration in which campus police were caught on video dousing seated protesters with pepper spray. (Photo: Louise Macabitas)
_____________________
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License

satanic-capitalist:

Image of Gas Attack Against Lone Brazilian Woman Goes Viral

Shocking images of police violence draw much-needed attention to protests and larger issue of police brutality

- Lauren McCauley, staff writer

A more widely-cropped version of the now viral photograph shows just how isolated the woman was when she was attacked by officers in Rio de Janiero, Brazil Monday evening. (Photo: Victor Caivano)A captured instance of brazen police brutality against a civilian has, once again, captured the attention of the global community. The shocking photograph of a lone woman being pepper sprayed at close range by Brazilian police has gone viral, drawing criticism and attention to the ongoing mass demonstrations in Brazil—at which the attack took place—and the chronic undercurrent of police violence that so often follows peaceful citizen uprisings.

New York Magazine’s Daily Intelligencer spoke with the photographer behind the image, Victor Caivano, who said that the attack happened at around 11:20 PM Monday evening, long after “the protest was over, riots included.”

The woman appeared to be a “normal, middle-class university student,” he said, adding that she was standing alone on a “deserted corner” after the police had cleared the area.

He continued:

Three riot officers approached the woman and told her to leave. When she objected — the woman either questioned the order or insisted that she wasn’t doing anything wrong, Caivano recalls — she was pepper-sprayed. “This policeman just didn’t think twice,” Caivano says.

The woman stumbled backward, “screaming and cursing.” She was detained and taken to a police van. Caivano says local reporters are now trying to track her down.

The photograph has drawn obvious comparison to two similar images of the unbridled use of pepper spray, each encapsulating the fierce police brutality that too often comes hand-in-hand with such demonstrations.

One is of a woman named Ceyda Sungur—the ‘woman in the red dress’—who, during arecent protest in Istanbul’s Gezi Park, was bombarded by an officer who shot pepper spray directly into her face.

“The jet sent her hair billowing upwards,” wrote the Guardian at the time. “As she turned, the masked policeman leapt forward and hosed down her back. The unprovoked attack left her and other activists choking and gasping for breath; afterwards Sungur collapsed on a bench.”

Ceyda Sungur is gassed in Gezi Park in Istanbul, Turkey on June 4, 2013. (Screenshot via Osman Orsal /YouTube)The second image is of the infamous incident at the University of California at Davis when a peaceful Occupy protest was met with an overly aggressive show of police force. This culminated in Officer John Pike directly and deliberately spraying burning yellow chemicals into the faces of the protesters.

“To see unarmed, unaggressive bystanders who, by virtue of their location at a time and place where trouble was brewing, were assaulted by authority figures spraying burning, toxic, chemicals, is an unforgettable visual,” writes columnist Lorraine Devon Wilke. She continues:

Likely there are many more that occur every day; these particular ones exist as iconic moments that symbolize bigger movements, of countries, of people, even of students. These images are important historical documents of what happened, how, and to whom. Hopefully they will contribute, by sheer virtue of their shock value, to change, progress, and needed solutions; the agony of those attacked has to account for something of value.

Twenty-one students and alumni filed a federal lawsuit on February 22, 2012 against UC Davis over the University’s treatment of protesters during a Nov. 18, 2011 Occupy demonstration in which campus police were caught on video dousing seated protesters with pepper spray. (Photo: Louise Macabitas)

_____________________

Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

Reblogged from The Satanic Capitalist

warlikeparakeet88:

03.01.13 - 12:04 PM


Not Guilty By Virtue of Videotape, Which, Unlike the Police, Doesn’t Lie

by Abby Zimet

In the first jury trial stemming from Occupy Wall Street protests, activist and community organizer Michael Premo was found innocent of all charges after his lawyers presented video evidence that directly contradicted the story told by police and prosecutors. Premo was facing felony charges of assaulting an officer during a demonstration in Lower Manhattan that also drew clergymen. Police said he tackled officers as they were kettling protesters, but unearthed video from Democracy Now showed that in fact police threw him down to the ground. Lesson of the day: Keep filming.
Also: Occupy the SEC has filed a lawsuit against procrastinating bank regulators to get the Volcker rule, which would rein in Wall Street, in place.

warlikeparakeet88:

Not Guilty By Virtue of Videotape, Which, Unlike the Police, Doesn’t Lie

by Abby Zimet

In the first jury trial stemming from Occupy Wall Street protests, activist and community organizer Michael Premo was found innocent of all charges after his lawyers presented video evidence that directly contradicted the story told by police and prosecutors. Premo was facing felony charges of assaulting an officer during a demonstration in Lower Manhattan that also drew clergymen. Police said he tackled officers as they were kettling protesters, but unearthed video from Democracy Now showed that in fact police threw him down to the ground. Lesson of the day: Keep filming.

Also: Occupy the SEC has filed a lawsuit against procrastinating bank regulators to get the Volcker rule, which would rein in Wall Street, in place.

Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

Reblogged from Warlike Parakeet

The first thing to remember with Shemekia Moffitt

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

is don’t trust anything the police and the media tell you.

Stop and think for a minute. Winnsboro is Klan country, a short drive from Jena. Do you think there aren’t Klansmen and sympathizers in the Winnsboro police?

As my comrade Tony Murphy wrote: “I would also like to point out the speed at which the Winnsboro police have cast doubt on her story — compared to the foot dragging that Trayvon Martin’s parent’s encountered when they tried to find out what happened to their son. One article had the police determining this was a hoax in ‘less than 24 hours,’ performing analyses of the car, her fingerprints — they were a regular CSI Winnsboro.  

“In Sanford, police had Trayvon’s body in the morgue for two days while the parents frantically called them looking for their son. I saw Winnsboro referred to as being in the ‘Klanbelt’ — Jena is 60 miles away, and another town, Ruston, is 75 miles away, where the Klan marched in the late ‘90s.”

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Thirteen Cokes, Please.”
Clara Luper, an Oklahoma history teacher, ordered those Cokes at Katz Drugstore in Oklahoma City on August 19, 1958 for herself and twelve children, ages 6 to 17. Lunch counters in Oklahoma, like much of the South, were segregated. This wasn’t just a request for drinks, but a request for civil rights.
Waitresses ignored them. Other patrons did not: leaving the restaurant, pouring drinks on them, cursing at them. (Did I mention there were children as young as six?) The group left after a few hours without a drink. They returned the next day and were served their Cokes, and burgers, too.
“Within that hamburger was the whole essence of democracy.” - Clara Luper
Note: This took place a year and a half before the much more famous sit-in at the Greensboro (NC) Woolworth’s on February 1, 1960.
Luper would continue her fight to desegregate public spaces in Oklahoma City. She was arrested 26 times between 1958 and the passage of Oklahoma law to desegregate. (Passed two days after the Civil Rights Act.)
(Fantastic image is courtesy of Black Past.)

#clara luper #oklahoma #oklahoma city #civil rights #desegregation #police #arrests #repression #racism 

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Thirteen Cokes, Please.”

Clara Luper, an Oklahoma history teacher, ordered those Cokes at Katz Drugstore in Oklahoma City on August 19, 1958 for herself and twelve children, ages 6 to 17. Lunch counters in Oklahoma, like much of the South, were segregated. This wasn’t just a request for drinks, but a request for civil rights.

Waitresses ignored them. Other patrons did not: leaving the restaurant, pouring drinks on them, cursing at them. (Did I mention there were children as young as six?) The group left after a few hours without a drink. They returned the next day and were served their Cokes, and burgers, too.

“Within that hamburger was the whole essence of democracy.” - Clara Luper

Note: This took place a year and a half before the much more famous sit-in at the Greensboro (NC) Woolworth’s on February 1, 1960.

Luper would continue her fight to desegregate public spaces in Oklahoma City. She was arrested 26 times between 1958 and the passage of Oklahoma law to desegregate. (Passed two days after the Civil Rights Act.)

(Fantastic image is courtesy of Black Past.)

(via fuckyeahriotgrrrlsofcolor)