Culture of Resistance

warlikeparakeet88:

Palestinians Can Learn From the African-American Struggle - Ali Abunimah on RAI (2/5)

Published on May 14, 2014

On Reality Asserts Itself, Ali Abunimah, founder of Electronic Intifada, says that Palestinians need to know that even in a country with formal legal equality, the reality can mean mass incarceration, economic inequality and racism

(via sustainableprosperity)

Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

rtamerica:

Thousands protest against police ahead of 13-year-old shooting victim’s funeral
Over 1,000 people showed up to protest the death of Andy Lopez hours before the funeral for the 13-year-old boy was scheduled to take place. California police fatally shot Lopez last week when they saw him carrying what turned out to be a toy rifle.
The Tuesday rally began at approximately 12pm local time and only seemed to grow as the day went on. Demonstrators planned to march through the small city of Santa Rosa, California, located approximately 50 miles north of San Francisco.
Signs reading “We are all Andy Lopez, the whole damn system is guilty” and “Andy did not have to die” were on display alongside police officers in riot gear who were monitoring the crowd.

rtamerica:

Thousands protest against police ahead of 13-year-old shooting victim’s funeral

Over 1,000 people showed up to protest the death of Andy Lopez hours before the funeral for the 13-year-old boy was scheduled to take place. California police fatally shot Lopez last week when they saw him carrying what turned out to be a toy rifle.

The Tuesday rally began at approximately 12pm local time and only seemed to grow as the day went on. Demonstrators planned to march through the small city of Santa Rosa, California, located approximately 50 miles north of San Francisco.

Signs reading “We are all Andy Lopez, the whole damn system is guilty” and “Andy did not have to die” were on display alongside police officers in riot gear who were monitoring the crowd.

Reblogged from RT America

Activists kidnapped and tortured by Brazilian authorities

Beginning on Wednesday, August 22nd, during demonstrations in downtown Recife, there have been reports of plain clothed police officers kidnapping and torturing protestors.

Victims were at home, or on their way home, when they were approached violently and cuffed. They were forced into vehicles, where they were beaten, threatened with guns and tasers, and tortured on the way to the police station.

Some people are still MISSING!

One victim was found hours after his disappearance, thrown unconscious on a street with marks of aggression throughout his body.

Another was taken to a police station, thrown to the floor, and kicked repeatedly in the head until another officer intervened.

It is believed that orders for these abductions came DIRECTLY FROM THE OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR Eduardo Campos (PSB).

Source: http://tinyurl.com/lcx3jxh

Florida to review death of artist who was tasered by police

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement confirmed in an interview on Friday that it would conduct an independent review of the death of an 18-year-old graffiti artist who died after being electroshocked by a taser during a police chase in Miami Beach.

Israel Hernandez-Llach died early on Tuesday morning after police caught him spray-painting the wall of a former McDonald’s restaurant.

MORE RELATED TO THIS STORY

The FDLE agreed to review the investigation at the request of the Miami Beach Police Department, FDLE spokeswoman Gretel Plessinger told Reuters. The Miami Beach Police Department would remain the lead investigative agency, she said, but the FDLE would review its findings.

The family of Hernandez-Llach, a young artist known as “Reefa,” had called for an independent investigation of the incident at a press conference on Thursday.

At the press conference the artist’s father, Israel Hernandez-Bandera, called his son’s death “an act of barbarism” and an “assassination of a young artist and photographer.”

The city of Miami Beach announced in a news release on Friday they had requested the FDLE review. The state attorney and the medical examiner for Miami-Dade County are also reviewing the case, according to the news release.

“I have complete confidence in the integrity and capacity of the Miami Beach Police Department to conduct a fair and thorough investigation,” Miami Beach City Manager Jimmy Morales was quoted as saying in the news release. “But the role of the FDLE will provide further assurance to the public of the thoroughness and transparency of the investigation.”

Lawyers for the artist’s family welcomed the announcement of the FDLE review, even though it appeared to fall short of a full-blown investigation.

“Israel’s family is pleased that their pleas for an independent investigation into the actions of the police officers involved in this young man’s death have been heard,” lawyers for the family said in a statement.

“The family, like everyone else who knew and loved Israel, are eager to get to the bottom of what happened. We fully expect the FDLE will conduct a thorough and independent investigation,” the attorneys said.

Miami Beach Police Chief Raymond Martinez said Hernandez-Llach fled after being seen “vandalizing private property.” He was chased by police and ignored commands to stop running, at which point an officer used his taser, the police chief said in a statement.

Officer Jorge Mercado, who fired his stun-gun at the Colombian-born teenager, has been placed on paid administrative leave.

The Miami Beach Police Department has come under scrutiny for a series of shootings and improper conduct in recent years, including the death of 22-year-old man who was shot 16 times by police two years ago during a Memorial Day weekend hip-hop festival.

“All of us at the City of Miami Beach continue to be saddened by this unfortunate incident and our condolences go out to the Hernandez family,” Morales added.

Family and friends plan to hold a protest vigil on Miami Beach at 1 p.m. on Saturday afternoon at the wall where Hernandez-Llach was seen spray-painting.

the-last-moonset:

x

The raging fire that tore through the log cabin in Big Bear Lake, CA, where cop killer Christopher Dorner died Tuesday night was no accident.

The national news media is silent on the cause of the blaze. But raw audio from police radio transmissions makes the cause of the blaze very clear.

In an audio uploaded to YouTube.com, a male officer is heard yelling “Burn this motherf*cker!” before the cabin where the cop killer took refuge went up in flames.

“We’re gonna go forward with the plan.. with the burners.. like we talked about,” a male voice can be heard instructing other officers.

“7 burners deployed and we have a fire,” says a male officer. A female voice is heard confirming.

“We have fire in the front, he might come out the back,” says a male voice on the tape.

Apparently, Dorner shoots himself as the cabin is set ablaze. “One shot fired from inside the residence,” says a male voice as cheers go up in the background.

“Stand by. Maintain your discipline,” says an authoritative voice.

The officers then indicate that the cabin is “fully engulfed” in flames.

Moments later a call goes out for fire trucks to extinguish the blaze.

Dorner’s charred remains were pulled from the burned out cabin early Wednesday morning.

(via hackr)

warlikeparakeet88:


A Year After Ramarley Graham’s Murder, a Movement Against Police Brutality Grows
By Graciela Razo

On February 1, 2012, 18-year-old Ramarley Graham was gunned down in his own home by New York City police in front of his grandmother and 6-year-old brother. The unarmed black teenager was killed with a bullet to the chest by officer Richard Haste after police broke into his family’s apartment claiming Graham had a gun.
On Friday, the one year anniversary of Graham’s murder, his family filed a suit against Haste, Police Commissioner Ray Kelly and other officers for use of the discriminatory stop-and-frisk tactic and for allegedly covering up evidence from the day their son was murdered.
Unlike many other cases surrounding police violence, Haste faces a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison on first and second degree murder charges; he is the first NYPD officer to face criminal charges for a fatal shooting since 2007 when three officers were indicted for the murder of Sean Bell, another black victim who was shot 50 times.
Police violence hits communities of color
Graham’s murder is a familiar nightmare to many communities across the United States terrorized by police violence. From Harlem to Oakland, youth are subjected to legalized racial profiling, known as stop-and-frisk, which disproportionately targets 87 percent black and Latino people. Harassment and violence from area police forces have been a reality for communities of color for decades.
But families rarely see justice for their slain loved ones; officers typically receive what amounts to a slap on the wrist with paid leave. One such instance was the murder of black Oakland teenager Alan Blueford, who was shot three times by Oakland police and left dead in the street for four hours in May 2012, weeks before Blueford was set to graduate from high school.
Another was the shooting of Anaheim resident Manuel Diaz in July 2012. During a chase, police shot Diaz once in the leg and another time in the back of his head. Two days later, Anaheim police shot and killed Joel Acevedo during a car chase. Community members were outraged at the killings and demanded justice. According to Orange County DA records, there were 40 shootings by Anaheim police from 2003 to February 2011. Not one officer has been charged.
In New York City, incidents like these without reprimand occur all too often. Last June, NYPD narcotics detective Phillip Atkins shot 23-year-old Shantel Davis in the chest as the unarmed woman held her arms up crying out, “Don’t shoot me.” In September, NYPD officers opened fire and killed 20-year-old Reynaldo Cuevas as his Bronx bodega was being robbed. A month later, Noel Polanco was shot point blank after he was pulled over in his neighborhood in Queens.
The NYPD has led the way in police violence, paying a staggering $550 million to settle 8,882 lawsuits in 2011 alone. At the beginning of this year, a Manhattan Federal Court judge ruled that the tactic of stop-and-frisk was unconstitutional outside private residential buildings. However, shortly after, another judge lifted the ban on stops and searches of “suspicious looking people,” allowing stop-and-frisk to continue until the case goes to trial in March.
Families organize for justice
Families afflicted by police violence have responded by brewing up a social justice movement to put an end to unwarranted searches, frisks and shootings. Communities are organizing, storming courtrooms and police precincts to demand accountability and justice for the brutal acts. Organizations like All Things Harlem, Stop Police Brutality and NYCresistance are developing tactics to counter and prevent these attacks in their neighborhoods.
Activist Joseph “Jazz” Hayden of All Things Harlem has created a network of resistance by documenting police interactions and has been a strong voice against NYPD racial profiling and violence. Although he has directly been targeted by police for filming arrests and harassment in his neighborhood, Hayden continues to share incriminating videos of officers in an attempt to hold police responsible for civil liberties violations.
“Police violence in our black and brown communities isn’t anything new. They have tried to incriminate our youth, but we aren’t backing down,” Hayden said. “We have to continue to fight for our futures.”
Baltimore civil rights activist Reverend Annie Chambers has been a leading anti-police brutality advocate, organizing community members and families ever since her great grandson was murdered near her home in a case of mistaken identity.
“You look outside my window and see police cars at any time of the day,” Chambers said. “I have seen them with their brutality over and over again. Young people are now at the part where they won’t take it anymore.”
And now, family members of the slain are increasingly taking the justice system into their own hands. Ramarley Graham’s parents continue, one year on, to lead marches to police precincts reminiscent of the Civil Rights era, not only in remembrance of their son but for all those who have died at the hands of uniformed officers.
Alan Blueford’s parents have created Justice 4 Alan Blueford and hold weekly meetings to end racial profiling and police violence in the Bay Area.
Their case, and similar ones, are now pushing law enforcement officers into the national discussion about gun control and violence, spurring a new form of resistance by communities and neighborhoods long terrorized by unaccountable police brutality.
This article was published at NationofChange at: http://www.nationofchange.org/year-after-ramarley-graham-s-murder-movement-against-police-brutality-grows-1360336751. All rights are reserved.

warlikeparakeet88:

image

A Year After Ramarley Graham’s Murder, a Movement Against Police Brutality Grows

By Graciela Razo

On February 1, 2012, 18-year-old Ramarley Graham was gunned down in his own home by New York City police in front of his grandmother and 6-year-old brother. The unarmed black teenager was killed with a bullet to the chest by officer Richard Haste after police broke into his family’s apartment claiming Graham had a gun.

On Friday, the one year anniversary of Graham’s murder, his family filed a suit against Haste, Police Commissioner Ray Kelly and other officers for use of the discriminatory stop-and-frisk tactic and for allegedly covering up evidence from the day their son was murdered.

Unlike many other cases surrounding police violence, Haste faces a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison on first and second degree murder charges; he is the first NYPD officer to face criminal charges for a fatal shooting since 2007 when three officers were indicted for the murder of Sean Bell, another black victim who was shot 50 times.

Police violence hits communities of color

Graham’s murder is a familiar nightmare to many communities across the United States terrorized by police violence. From Harlem to Oakland, youth are subjected to legalized racial profiling, known as stop-and-frisk, which disproportionately targets 87 percent black and Latino people. Harassment and violence from area police forces have been a reality for communities of color for decades.

But families rarely see justice for their slain loved ones; officers typically receive what amounts to a slap on the wrist with paid leave. One such instance was the murder of black Oakland teenager Alan Blueford, who was shot three times by Oakland police and left dead in the street for four hours in May 2012, weeks before Blueford was set to graduate from high school.

Another was the shooting of Anaheim resident Manuel Diaz in July 2012. During a chase, police shot Diaz once in the leg and another time in the back of his head. Two days later, Anaheim police shot and killed Joel Acevedo during a car chase. Community members were outraged at the killings and demanded justice. According to Orange County DA records, there were 40 shootings by Anaheim police from 2003 to February 2011. Not one officer has been charged.

In New York City, incidents like these without reprimand occur all too often. Last June, NYPD narcotics detective Phillip Atkins shot 23-year-old Shantel Davis in the chest as the unarmed woman held her arms up crying out, “Don’t shoot me.” In September, NYPD officers opened fire and killed 20-year-old Reynaldo Cuevas as his Bronx bodega was being robbed. A month later, Noel Polanco was shot point blank after he was pulled over in his neighborhood in Queens.

The NYPD has led the way in police violence, paying a staggering $550 million to settle 8,882 lawsuits in 2011 alone. At the beginning of this year, a Manhattan Federal Court judge ruled that the tactic of stop-and-frisk was unconstitutional outside private residential buildings. However, shortly after, another judge lifted the ban on stops and searches of “suspicious looking people,” allowing stop-and-frisk to continue until the case goes to trial in March.

Families organize for justice

Families afflicted by police violence have responded by brewing up a social justice movement to put an end to unwarranted searches, frisks and shootings. Communities are organizing, storming courtrooms and police precincts to demand accountability and justice for the brutal acts. Organizations like All Things Harlem, Stop Police Brutality and NYCresistance are developing tactics to counter and prevent these attacks in their neighborhoods.

Activist Joseph “Jazz” Hayden of All Things Harlem has created a network of resistance by documenting police interactions and has been a strong voice against NYPD racial profiling and violence. Although he has directly been targeted by police for filming arrests and harassment in his neighborhood, Hayden continues to share incriminating videos of officers in an attempt to hold police responsible for civil liberties violations.

“Police violence in our black and brown communities isn’t anything new. They have tried to incriminate our youth, but we aren’t backing down,” Hayden said. “We have to continue to fight for our futures.”

Baltimore civil rights activist Reverend Annie Chambers has been a leading anti-police brutality advocate, organizing community members and families ever since her great grandson was murdered near her home in a case of mistaken identity.

“You look outside my window and see police cars at any time of the day,” Chambers said. “I have seen them with their brutality over and over again. Young people are now at the part where they won’t take it anymore.”

And now, family members of the slain are increasingly taking the justice system into their own hands. Ramarley Graham’s parents continue, one year on, to lead marches to police precincts reminiscent of the Civil Rights era, not only in remembrance of their son but for all those who have died at the hands of uniformed officers.

Alan Blueford’s parents have created Justice 4 Alan Blueford and hold weekly meetings to end racial profiling and police violence in the Bay Area.

Their case, and similar ones, are now pushing law enforcement officers into the national discussion about gun control and violence, spurring a new form of resistance by communities and neighborhoods long terrorized by unaccountable police brutality.

This article was published at NationofChange at: http://www.nationofchange.org/year-after-ramarley-graham-s-murder-movement-against-police-brutality-grows-1360336751. All rights are reserved.

(via sustainableprosperity)

Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

immigrantstories:

nemyy:

On January 12, 2010, one day after his 18th birthday, CAPA High School honors student Jordan Trent Miles was ambushed by three plain clothes Pittsburgh police officers, who failed to identify themselves and approached him aggressively. The officers did not say “Stop! Police!”, they jumped out of an unmarked vehicle, one of them yelling “Where’s your money? Where’s the drugs? Where’s the gun?” Miles, never before in trouble with the police and thinking he was being robbed, began to run, and slipped on the icy sidewalk. The officers overtook Miles and administered a brutal beating that left him unrecognizable, ripping dreadlocks out of his head, and continuing to beat him as he lay on the ground after their initial assault, stammering the Lord’s Prayer. There can be no explaining away or excusing what was done to Miles.

The police officers lied about what happened, claiming there was a bulge in his pocket they assumed was a gun but “turned out to be a Mountain Dew bottle”. No bottle was ever entered into evidence, and Jordan and his friends will tell you he doesn’t even drink the soda. The officers also attempted to claim a neighbor reported him as a prowler and attempted to bring assault charges against Miles, which were tossed out of court when the neighbor said she did no such thing. Despite all this, the City of Pittsburgh went on to reward these violent officers with a commendation and, during their suspension, paid them more than they earned while working. Meanwhile, the Pittsburgh DA has not brought charges and the Justice Department announced on May 4th, 2011 that it would not prosecute the three officers. The mayor and police chief announced on May 5th that the three officers would be returning to work.

“I feel that my son was racially profiled,” Terez Miles said. “It’s a rough neighborhood; it was after dark. … They assumed he was up to no good because he’s black. My son, he knows nothing about the streets at all. He’s had a very sheltered life, he’s very quiet, he doesn’t know police officers sit in cars and stalk people like that.”

http://justiceforjordanmiles.com/

wtf no. im gonna cry. -___ - whyyyy

Oh my Allah.

“Despite all this, the City of Pittsburgh went on to reward these violent officers with a commendation and, during their suspension, paid them more than they earned while working. Meanwhile, the Pittsburgh DA has not brought charges and the Justice Department announced on May 4th, 2011 that it would not prosecute the three officers. The mayor and police chief announced on May 5th that the three officers would be returning to work.”

thepeoplesrecord:

NYPD beat homeless man in synagogue outreach centerOctober 17, 2012
The NYPD beat up a homeless man in Brooklyn last week as he resisted arrest for sleeping in a synagogue outreach center, where he had permission to stay. Surveillance video obtained by local news siteCrownHeights.info shows two officers brutally beating a shoeless and shirtless man, Ehud Halevi, who insisted he had permission to be in the center for troubled youth, ALIYA (Alternative Learning Institute for Young Adults).
Although sources confirmed with CrownHeights.info that Halevi had been sleeping in the space for a month with permission, one security guard, unaware of the arrangement, called the police. The guard later told the New York Daily News that he regretted making the call.
According to Gothamist, “[Halevi] was also pepper sprayed during the arrest, [and] was charged with assaulting a police officer, trespassing, resisting arrest and harassment. He’s currently out on bail and faces up to five years in prison for assaulting an officer.” The NYPD have yet to issue comment.
Watch the graphic video here.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

NYPD beat homeless man in synagogue outreach center
October 17, 2012

The NYPD beat up a homeless man in Brooklyn last week as he resisted arrest for sleeping in a synagogue outreach center, where he had permission to stay. Surveillance video obtained by local news siteCrownHeights.info shows two officers brutally beating a shoeless and shirtless man, Ehud Halevi, who insisted he had permission to be in the center for troubled youth, ALIYA (Alternative Learning Institute for Young Adults).

Although sources confirmed with CrownHeights.info that Halevi had been sleeping in the space for a month with permission, one security guard, unaware of the arrangement, called the police. The guard later told the New York Daily News that he regretted making the call.

According to Gothamist, “[Halevi] was also pepper sprayed during the arrest, [and] was charged with assaulting a police officer, trespassing, resisting arrest and harassment. He’s currently out on bail and faces up to five years in prison for assaulting an officer.” The NYPD have yet to issue comment.

Watch the graphic video here.

Source

(via amodernmanifesto)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Palestinian activist Bassem Tamimi is arrested and beaten by Israeli police at the Rami Levi supermarket opened in Shaar Binyamin close to the city of Ramallah in the Israeli occupied Palestinian West Bank on October 24, 2012, as the protesters called for a boycott of goods being produced in the Jewish Settlement.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Palestinian activist Bassem Tamimi is arrested and beaten by Israeli police at the Rami Levi supermarket opened in Shaar Binyamin close to the city of Ramallah in the Israeli occupied Palestinian West Bank on October 24, 2012, as the protesters called for a boycott of goods being produced in the Jewish Settlement.


thepeoplesrecord:

Alabama police officer shot and killed naked student despite having non-lethal arsenal
October 13, 2012
An Alabama police officer shot and killed a naked college student, despite also carrying a baton and pepper spray. Police claimed officer’s the use of deadly force was necessary.
Last Saturday, officer Trevis Austin, a four-year employee in his first police job, was reportedly armed with the two non-lethal weapons and a gun when he exited the police station to confront 18-year-old University of Southern Alabama freshman Gil Collar.
Collar was naked, and had been seen banging on the police department’s door that night.
The wounded student got back up after being shot once in the chest, and backup officers arrived seconds after the shooting took place.
Authorities said that Collar, a heavyset man, was on LSD and behaved aggressively toward the officer, prompting the shooting.
Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran told reporters that the killing was justified, “because the events were evolving so rapidly and he was so close that had he put the pistol in the holster, I don’t know that he could have drawn something else.” 
CCTV footage of the incident revealed that the student did not attempt to grab the Austin’s weapon, nor did he get closer than a meter and a half to the officer. Police did not explain why Austin did not choose to use a non-lethal weapon.­
An attorney for Collar’s family, former Alabama Lieutenant Governor Jere Beasley, said the university’s policy “totally gives support to our position” that the killing was unjustified.
“There is no question the required force here was much less than shooting somebody,” he told the AP. “He could not say his life was in jeopardy or he was in fear of bodily harm.”
A grand jury will conduct a procedural review of the incident to determine whether charges should be filed. Officer Trevis Austin was also placed on administrative leave.
Collar’s funeral will take place on Saturday in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Alabama police officer shot and killed naked student despite having non-lethal arsenal

October 13, 2012

An Alabama police officer shot and killed a naked college student, despite also carrying a baton and pepper spray. Police claimed officer’s the use of deadly force was necessary.

Last Saturday, officer Trevis Austin, a four-year employee in his first police job, was reportedly armed with the two non-lethal weapons and a gun when he exited the police station to confront 18-year-old University of Southern Alabama freshman Gil Collar.

Collar was naked, and had been seen banging on the police department’s door that night.

The wounded student got back up after being shot once in the chest, and backup officers arrived seconds after the shooting took place.

Authorities said that Collar, a heavyset man, was on LSD and behaved aggressively toward the officer, prompting the shooting.

Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran told reporters that the killing was justified, “because the events were evolving so rapidly and he was so close that had he put the pistol in the holster, I don’t know that he could have drawn something else.” 

CCTV footage of the incident revealed that the student did not attempt to grab the Austin’s weapon, nor did he get closer than a meter and a half to the officer. Police did not explain why Austin did not choose to use a non-lethal weapon.­

An attorney for Collar’s family, former Alabama Lieutenant Governor Jere Beasley, said the university’s policy “totally gives support to our position” that the killing was unjustified.

“There is no question the required force here was much less than shooting somebody,” he told the AP. “He could not say his life was in jeopardy or he was in fear of bodily harm.”

A grand jury will conduct a procedural review of the incident to determine whether charges should be filed. Officer Trevis Austin was also placed on administrative leave.

Collar’s funeral will take place on Saturday in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Source

(via queerencia-deactivated20130103)

unpaislibre:

ladymosca:

25S Detención de señora plaza Neptuno (por blanhiblar)

25S plaza Neptuno. Detienen a una señora por estar grabando y le requisan el iPhone.
Vídeo sin edición.

25s Plaza Neptuno España

Fascist police detain two elderly ladies for filming at the Madrid protests and seize the iphone of one of them. The force used is overwhelming.

(via unpaislibre)

beatyourselfup:

Police officer with a short fuse grows in patient with 77 year old grandmother who is begging to use the bathroom for medical reasons. She refuses to show her ID to the cop. Instead of being patient with her and helping her and then later citing her, the officer feels it’s necessary to rip the old woman out of her car and down onto the ground and arrest her.

(via beatyourselfup-deactivated20131)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

On September 7th, 2012, 20-year-old Bronx Resident and father Reynaldo Cuevas was shot and killed by an NYPD officer outside the bodega where he works. According to witnesses, Cuevas had tripped while attempting to escape an armed robbery inside the bodega. Immediately after, a 42nd precinct officer shot his gun, killing Cuevas, who was later dragged by the officer some 20-feet along the sidewalk.The shooting occurred just one block away from where unarmed 19-year-old Jateik Reed was recently beaten by a team of 42nd precinct officers.
— Take Back the Bronx

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

On September 7th, 2012, 20-year-old Bronx Resident and father Reynaldo Cuevas was shot and killed by an NYPD officer outside the bodega where he works. According to witnesses, Cuevas had tripped while attempting to escape an armed robbery inside the bodega. Immediately after, a 42nd precinct officer shot his gun, killing Cuevas, who was later dragged by the officer some 20-feet along the sidewalk.

The shooting occurred just one block away from where unarmed 19-year-old Jateik Reed was recently beaten by a team of 42nd precinct officers.

— Take Back the Bronx