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90 posts tagged racism

warlikeparakeet88:

Palestinians Can Learn From the African-American Struggle - Ali Abunimah on RAI (2/5)

Published on May 14, 2014

On Reality Asserts Itself, Ali Abunimah, founder of Electronic Intifada, says that Palestinians need to know that even in a country with formal legal equality, the reality can mean mass incarceration, economic inequality and racism

(via sustainableprosperity)

Posted by
Warlike Parakeet

I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin — we must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism and militarism are incapable of being conquered. (via SPECIAL: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in His Own Words | Democracy Now!)

Posted by
Lemond

I was in East Jerusalem, after the delegation, on my own, and staying at a Palestinian-owned hotel called the Jerusalem Hotel. And basically, in the Arab quarter near Salah ad-Din street and in this [area with] Palestinian markets. And I took a stroll up the hill, and found Jaffa road, and I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was like I was on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, or the Grove in L.A. It was just the strangest thing to see the juxtaposition, of the largely Jewish and tourist center of commerce with all the chains here, Coffee Bean, Yogurt Land, jewelery, clothing, ATMs at every little corner, granite paved roads, and then of course running through the middle of Jaffa street is the illegal Jerusalem Light Rail system. So to recognize that this space is normalized, a Western so-called bureaucratic capitalist space, a space of high consumerism is an eight-minute walk from what is essentially a ghetto in an occupied territory. That, that to me is even more shocking than seeing 20-something year-old Israelis looking through people’s passports and IDs and deciding whether or not you’re a threat. To me, that emphasis on normalization is one of the more dangerous things, because if they succeed in convincing the world that this is not a state of war or occupation but rather this is really the heart of the kind of Western democracy that’s like the rest of the world, the Western world at least–then in some ways that’s how they try and win. And part of what the boycott does is it delegitimizes the claim that this is a normal situation. It’s not a normal situation, it’s a settler-colonial situation, a situation of oppression.

Robin D.G. Kelley - “A Level of Racism I Have Never Seen” (via musaafer)

(via theyoungradical)

Posted by
Lemond

When white people complain about experiencing reverse racism, what they’re really complaining about is losing out on or being denied their already existing privileges. And while it may feel bad to realize your privilege is crumbling and the things you’ve taken for granted can be taken away from you, it is unfair, untrue, and disingenuous to call that experience reverse racism.

Sara Luckey | Why Reverse Racism Isn’t Real (via america-wakiewakie)

Reblogged from America Wakie Wakie

The Upper West Side, as the neighborhood was called, was supposed to be a “liberal” stronghold. I have never really understood exactly what a “liberal” is, though, since i have heard “liberals” express every conceivable opinion on every conceivable subject. As far as i can tell, you have the extreme right, who are fascist, racist capitalist dogs like Ronald Reagan, who come right out and let you know where they’re coming from. And on the opposite end, you have the left, who are supposed to be committed to justice, equality, and human rights. And somewhere between those two points is the liberal. As far as i’m concerned, “liberal” is the most meaningless word in the dictionary. History has shown me that as long as some white middle-class people can live high on the hog, take vacations to Europe, send their children to private schools, and reap the benefits of their white skin privileges, then they are “liberals”. But when times get hard and money gets tight, they pull off that liberal mask, and you think you’re talking to Adolf Hitler. They feel sorry for the so-called underprivileged just as long as they can maintain their own privileges.

from Assata: The Autobiography - Assata Shakur (via tissuebox)

(via theyoungradical)

Posted by
Lemond

One of the things that is always afflicted the American reality and the American vision is this aversion to history. History is not something you read about in a book; history is not even the past; it’s the present, because everybody operates-whether or not we know it-out of assumptions that are produced only by our history. The history of this country is not bloodier than that of other countries, but it’s bloody. It is not more criminal than that of other countries but it is criminal.

It is important to recognize that we did steal the land from the people who were here before us; we stole it! That person known as the American Indian! And we’re not talking about the past, we’re talking about the present. We did enslave millions of people because they were Black and we did make a lot of money out of slave labor. Neither is this uncommon; it’s a part of human history. But, it is one thing to do something, and another to deny it.

James Baldwin on history and America’s denial of it’s criminal history.

This is from a speech he gave at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. His honesty and sincerity throughout this speech and the question and answer period shows just how powerful a person he always was. The date is 1986; James Baldwin passed away in 1987.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

One time we had a happy donkey when there wasn’t a happy donkey, and some think they’re not enslaved.  Then Isabella isn’t happy.  Then something was wrong with slavery.  So I had to be happy to keep the master happy, because they’re not going to cross the mistress.  Out of this profound misapprehension has come a system of reality, a system of ideas even, a system of thought, which makes reality very hard to reach.  When the slave was discovered and put in chains, obviously he was debased along with his women and children, but he was not the only creature who was debased at that moment.  The man, the people, who put him in chains had also become less than human and debased themselves with a very great disadvantage.  Whereas the slave must know the master, because the master is the slave’s best and last chance.  And a master cannot fool a slave, but the slave can fool a master, and this master wants to be fooled.

My father, only he’s not interested[?], never dreamed of telling a white person the truth about anything.  It’s something that never entered his mind to do so.  He didn’t care what they thought.  He didn’t care whether they lived or died—he loathed them.  It was very exciting for me to watch.  My turn came too.  But I could see what happened, and the reason it’s important now is that under this endeavor, what we call  the white American has created only the nigger he wants to see.  The reason *that’s* important and terrifying, and corrupts the youth of the earth, is because when the same white man looks around the world, he sees only the nigger he wants to see and that is mortally dangerous for the future of this country, for our present fortunes. 

The world is full of all kinds of people who live quite beyond the confines of the American imagination and who are looking at whatever we *do* with a guilt-ridden vision of the world, which controls so much of our life and our thinking, and which perhaps paralyzes very nearly our moral sense.  We are living in a world in which every body and every thing is interdependent.  It is not white, this world; it is not black either.  The future of this world depends on everyone in this room.  And that future depends on to what extent and by what means we liberate ourselves from a vocabulary, which now cannot bear the weight of reality.

(via beemill)

Posted by
Lemond

President Obama’s policies have demonstrated, post the controversy around Reverend Wright, that the social indices, the economic indices of the black community are worse at the mass level than they were before. That’s not a total result of the policies of President Obama. It’s the crisis of capitalism, which they like to pretty up and call the financial crisis.

But the fact of the matter is that the history of racism is a living legacy. We have made much, much progress, but our jails are filled with young black men, increasingly young black women, brown young men, brown women. Our health situation, even for those in the upper class, the accumulative legacy of the things that we were fed, the communities that we were forced to live in, the racism against Obama and his family itself is evident that we are not in a post-racial society and that Obama did not look reality in the face and help the American people to grapple with that complex reality.

And grappling with that complex reality first and foremost means that his election is an advance not only for the black community, but it’s an advance for justice-seeking, fair-minded people people in the United States, all of those young white kids of voting age who stepped forward who wanted to see a new humanity, new world. It is a disappointment that he has come up with the theatrics to satisfy some kind of mass perspective that we are beyond race. And we certainly are not.

James Early | Obama and the “Post Racial Society” (via america-wakiewakie)

George Zimmerman has been arrested again—not for murdering Trayvon Martin—but for threatening his pregnant girlfriend with a shotgun…

[M]onths after Zimmerman’s acquittal, I am still vexed by how conservatives, colorblind racists, and the Gun Right (to the degree such a cohort can be disentangled) could flock to his defense. He is a serial loser. Why make Zimmerman the flag bearer and martyr figure for the cause of “gun rights?” Who could reasonably imagine George Zimmerman as a “victim?”

The answer lies in the power of the white racial frame to make insanity seem reasonable, and to normalize the monstrous. In all, racism, guns, and “reasonable doubt” trump the rights of black Americans, and other people of color, to be safe in their personhood from the violent prerogatives and prejudices of the White Gaze.

In private, many of Zimmerman’s defenders likely knew that he was an irresponsible person and guilty of murdering Trayvon Martin. However, their public commitment to white supremacy and symbolic racism trumps reason, ethics, and a broad humanism which embraces black Americans as worth the same protections and citizenship rights as white people.

WHITE SKIN PRIVILEGE: THIS TIME HE IS ARRESTED, BOOKED, AND HELD WITHOUT BAIL (via america-wakiewakie)

Reblogged from America Wakie Wakie

On the morning of George Zimmerman’s acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s murder earlier this year, with the mainstream media raising the specter of riots, blogger Jay Smooth made a prediction: ‘The fundamental danger of an acquittal is not more riots, it is more George Zimmermans.’

There were no riots. There have been more George Zimmermans.

Joel Reinstein | The racist killing of Renisha McBride (via america-wakiewakie)

america-wakiewakie:

america-wakiewakie:

James Baldwin debates William F. Buckley Jr. at Cambridge University | The Resolution: “Is the American Dream at the expense of the American Negro?”

Baldwin goes on to eloquently state the affirmative in what has to be one of the most encompassing and moving soliloquies I have ever heard. Excerpts follow, but do not sell yourselves short, watch it in its entirety:

“The white South African or Mississippi sharecropper or Alabama sheriff has at bottom a system of reality which compels them really to believe when they face the Negro that this woman, this man, this child must be insane to attack the system to which he owes his entire identity.”

“In the case of the American Negro, from the moment you are born every stick and stone, every face, is white. Since you have not yet seen a mirror, you suppose you are, too. It comes as a great shock around the age of 5, 6, or 7 to discover that the flag to which you have pledged allegiance, along with everybody else, has not pledged allegiance to you. It comes as a great shock to see Gary Cooper killing off the Indians, and although you are rooting for Gary Cooper, that the Indians are you.”

“From a very literal point of view, the harbors and the ports and the railroads of the country—the economy, especially in the South—could not conceivably be what they are if it had not been (and this is still so) for cheap labor. I am speaking very seriously, and this is not an overstatement: I picked cotton, I carried it to the market, I built the railroads under someone else’s whip for nothing. For nothing.”

The Southern oligarchy which has still today so very much power in Washington, and therefore some power in the world, was created by my labor and my sweat and the violation of my women and the murder of my children. This in the land of the free, the home of the brave.”

“Sheriff Clark in Selma, Ala., cannot be dismissed as a total monster; I am sure he loves his wife and children and likes to get drunk. One has to assume that he is a man like me. But he does not know what drives him to use the club, to menace with the gun and to use the cattle prod. Something awful must have happened to a human being to be able to put a cattle prod against a woman’s breasts. What happens to the woman is ghastly. What happens to the man who does it is in some ways much, much worse. Their moral lives have been destroyed by the plague called color.”

“It is a terrible thing for an entire people to surrender to the notion that one-ninth of its population is beneath them. Until the moment comes when we, the Americans, are able to accept the fact that my ancestors are both black and white, that on that continent we are trying to forge a new identity, that we need each other, that I am not a ward of America, I am not an object of missionary charity, I am one of the people who built the country—until this moment comes there is scarcely any hope for the American dream. If the people are denied participation in it, by their very presence they will wreck it. And if that happens it is a very grave moment for the West.”

Will keep reblogging until I see 500 notes at least. Baldwin is piercing and poetic. Watch this. Boost it. Remember it.

(via america-wakiewakie)

america-wakiewakie:

Rep. John Lewis Speaks Out Against GOP Voter Suppression Efforts

"It is hard and difficult and almost unbelievable that any member, especially a member from the state of Georgia, would come and offer such amendment. There’s a long history in our country, especially in the 11 states that are—of the old confederacy from Virginia to Texas, a discrim—of discrimination based on race. On color. Maybe some of us need to study a little contemporary history dealing with the question of voting rights. Just think, before the Voting Rights Act of 1965, it was almost impossible for many people in the state of Georgia, in Alabama, New York, Virginia, in Texas, to register to vote, to participate in the democratic process.

The state of Mississippi, for example, had a black voting aged population of more than 450,000 and only about 16,000 were registered to vote. One county in Alabama was more than 80% but not more than—but not a single registered African-American voter, people had to pass a literacy test. One man was asked to count the jelly beans in a jar. It’s shameful to come here tonight and say to the Department of Justice you must not use one penny, one cent, one dime, one dollar to carry out the mandate of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act.

We should be opening up the political process and letting all our citizens come in and participate. People died for the right to vote. Friends of mine. Colleagues of mine. Speak out against this amendment. It doesn’t have a place. I yield to the chairman. This is—I agree with the chairman. This is not the place. I will not yield. I urge my colleagues to vote against this amendment.”

(via america-wakiewakie)

america-wakiewakie:

The Revolutionary Love of Fred Hampton, Sr.
In the wee hours of the morning on December 4th, 1969, Fred Hampton, Sr., was assassinated by a coalition of law enforcement officers representing city, county and federal agencies in Chicago, Illinois. These lines, taken from some of his speeches, as presented in the movie, “The Murder of Fred Hampton,” are why:

"I was born in a bourgeois community and had some of the better things in life, but I found that there were more people starving than there were people eating, more people that didn’t have clothes than did have clothes, and I just happened to be one of the few. So I decided that I wouldn’t stop doing what I’m doing until all those people are free.
"We’re gonna have to do more than talk. We’re gonna have to do more than listen. We’re gonna have to do more than learn. We’re gonna have to start practicing and that’s very hard. We’re gonna have to start getting out there with the people and that’s difficult. Sometimes we think we’re better than the people so it’s gonna take a lot of hard work.
"You don’t fight fire with fire. You fight fire with water. We’re gonna fight racism with solidarity. We’re not gonna fight capitalism with Black capitalism. We’re gonna fight capitalism with socialism. Socialism is the people. If you’re afraid of socialism, you’re afraid of yourself.
"Without education, people will accept anything. Without education, what you’ll have is neo-colonialism instead of the colonialism like you have now. Without education, people don’t know why they’re doing what they’re doing, you know what I mean? You might get people caught up in an emotionalist movement, might get them because they’re poor and they want something and then if they’re not educated, they’ll want more and before you know it, we’ll have Negro imperialism.
"You have to understand that people have to pay the price for peace. If you dare to struggle, you dare to win. If you dare not struggle, then you don’t deserve to win. Let me say ‘Peace’ to you, if you’re willing to fight for it.
"Nothing is more important than stopping fascism because fascism will stop us all. We don’t hate White people. We hate the oppressor, whether they be White, Black, Brown or Yellow. We will work with anybody, coalesce with anybody that has revolution on their mind. But anybody that comes into our community and sets up anything that does not meet the needs of the masses, I will grab him by the neck and beat that man to death with a Black Panther paper.
"I’m going to do my job and I believe that I was born not to die in a car wreck. I don’t believe I’m going to die slipping on a piece of ice. I don’t believe I was born to die because of a bad heart. I don’t believe I was born to die of lung cancer. I believe I’m going to be able to do what I came to do. I believe that I’m going to be able to die high off the people. I believe that I will be able to die as a revolutionary in the international revolutionary proletariat struggle. And I hope that each one of you will be able to live in it. I think that struggles are going to come. Why don’t you live for the people? Why don’t you live for the struggle? Why don’t you die for the struggle?
"If you ain’t gonna do no revolutionary act, forget about me. I don’t want myself on your mind if you’re not gonna work for the people.
"I might not be back. I might be in jail. I might be anywhere. But you can believe that the last words on my lips were ‘I am a revolutionary.’
"You can kill a revolutionary, but you can’t kill the revolution."

america-wakiewakie:

The Revolutionary Love of Fred Hampton, Sr.

In the wee hours of the morning on December 4th, 1969, Fred Hampton, Sr., was assassinated by a coalition of law enforcement officers representing city, county and federal agencies in Chicago, Illinois. These lines, taken from some of his speeches, as presented in the movie, “The Murder of Fred Hampton,” are why:

"I was born in a bourgeois community and had some of the better things in life, but I found that there were more people starving than there were people eating, more people that didn’t have clothes than did have clothes, and I just happened to be one of the few. So I decided that I wouldn’t stop doing what I’m doing until all those people are free.

"We’re gonna have to do more than talk. We’re gonna have to do more than listen. We’re gonna have to do more than learn. We’re gonna have to start practicing and that’s very hard. We’re gonna have to start getting out there with the people and that’s difficult. Sometimes we think we’re better than the people so it’s gonna take a lot of hard work.

"You don’t fight fire with fire. You fight fire with water. We’re gonna fight racism with solidarity. We’re not gonna fight capitalism with Black capitalism. We’re gonna fight capitalism with socialism. Socialism is the people. If you’re afraid of socialism, you’re afraid of yourself.

"Without education, people will accept anything. Without education, what you’ll have is neo-colonialism instead of the colonialism like you have now. Without education, people don’t know why they’re doing what they’re doing, you know what I mean? You might get people caught up in an emotionalist movement, might get them because they’re poor and they want something and then if they’re not educated, they’ll want more and before you know it, we’ll have Negro imperialism.

"You have to understand that people have to pay the price for peace. If you dare to struggle, you dare to win. If you dare not struggle, then you don’t deserve to win. Let me say ‘Peace’ to you, if you’re willing to fight for it.

"Nothing is more important than stopping fascism because fascism will stop us all. We don’t hate White people. We hate the oppressor, whether they be White, Black, Brown or Yellow. We will work with anybody, coalesce with anybody that has revolution on their mind. But anybody that comes into our community and sets up anything that does not meet the needs of the masses, I will grab him by the neck and beat that man to death with a Black Panther paper.

"I’m going to do my job and I believe that I was born not to die in a car wreck. I don’t believe I’m going to die slipping on a piece of ice. I don’t believe I was born to die because of a bad heart. I don’t believe I was born to die of lung cancer. I believe I’m going to be able to do what I came to do. I believe that I’m going to be able to die high off the people. I believe that I will be able to die as a revolutionary in the international revolutionary proletariat struggle. And I hope that each one of you will be able to live in it. I think that struggles are going to come. Why don’t you live for the people? Why don’t you live for the struggle? Why don’t you die for the struggle?

"If you ain’t gonna do no revolutionary act, forget about me. I don’t want myself on your mind if you’re not gonna work for the people.

"I might not be back. I might be in jail. I might be anywhere. But you can believe that the last words on my lips were ‘I am a revolutionary.’

"You can kill a revolutionary, but you can’t kill the revolution."